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BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK
in Indiana

Note: This is not the official Park website. 

This site contains Brown County State Park information but is not sponsered by the Park, or the State of Indiana. We do not take reservations for State Park facilities.

1810 State Road 46 E, Nashville
(812) 988-6406

INTRODUCTION TO BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK

Brown County State Park History

RECREATION:

Hiking Trails         Picnic Areas & Shelter Houses      Saddle Barn & Horseback Riding 
Nature Center     Fishing/Ice Fishing      Swimming Pool  / Water slide and whirlpool
Playing Field    Playgrounds     Tennis Courts    Camp Store    Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve

Ogle Lake   Strahl Lake

 LODGING:/ CAMPING

    Campgrounds    
Class A sites    Class B sites     Rally sites    Youth Tent Areas
Horsemen's Campground    Class A sites        Class C sites 

Cabins     Abe Martin Lodge and Restaurant:

MISC.

Dumping Station    

 PARK INFO:

    Park History    Park Rules    Entrance locations      Maps     Location 

COMPLETE SUMMER and WINTER INFORMATION and FEES for
BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK

FEES

Entrance Fees

CAMPSITE RATES   
Standard Rates    Horseman's Camping    Other CRS camping rates   
"First come, first served" camping:

License Fees for Hunting and Fishing

COMPLETE SUMMER and WINTER INFORMATION and FEES for
BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK

    Contact Info 

Brown County was the site of the biking events at the 1987 Pan American Games.

Brown County State Park is located in the rolling hills of Southern Indiana, between Bloomington and Columbus, close to the historic artists' village of Nashville, Indiana.

 


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Brown County State Park is an Indiana state park on 15,696 acres near Nashville in Brown County, Indiana in the United States.

Located in the beautiful hills of Brown County off Highway 46, Brown County State Park is every Hoosier's favorite playground. You will enjoy the variety of outdoor activity choices offered here and in the Village of Nashville, Indiana.

Brown County State Park is famous for fall foliage. Numerous overlooks provide spectacular views of the surrounding hills and forests of south central Indiana, and during the annual "changing of the colors", park roadways can be jammed with vehicles. There is more to Brown County State Park than pretty leaves, however.

Nearby Nashville, Indiana, historic Hoosier artists' colony, features quaint specialty shops, artist studios & craft galleries, historic homes, live theatre, music entertainment & fine dining.

The park opened to the public in 1929, and is Indiana's largest state park. It is second to Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (2.2 million visitors) as the most visited park in the state with more than 1.4 million visitors per year.  It is located along the Knobstone Escarpment and features dramatic views from its highest elevations.

The Knobstone Escarpment is a rugged geologic region in Southern Indiana. Physically, the Knobstone Escarpment is the most rugged terrain in Indiana. The highest hill in the area is Weed Patch Hill, with an elevation of 1,056 feet above sea level.

The escarpment's most prominent feature is its steep hills, often called knobs, and ravines.

Brown County State Park was formed originally from the 1924-established Brown County State Game Preserve, which gave the state park its initial 1,000 acres.

A variety of wildlife species adapted to life in the forest and forest edges can be found at Brown County State Park. Mammals found in the park include white-tailed deer, raccoon and gray squirrel. Birds include robin, white-breasted nuthatch, bluejay, cardinal, junco and crow. Wild turkeys also call the park home.

Eventually, the game preserve would dissolve into the park.

Included within the park boundaries are two lakes: Ogle Lake at 17 acres in size, and Strahl Lake covering 7 acres. In 1934, the Civilian Conservation Corps constructed many of the buildings, roads, shelters, ovens and trails in existence today. The park and trails are maintained by longtime Department of Natural Resources naturalist Jim Eagleman who lives at the top of the fire tower near the park's Nature Center.
There are 70 miles of bridle trails and 12 miles of hiking trails.

  • Mountain bikers yield to horse riders and hikers. Make your approach known well in advance.

  • Hikers yield to horse riders. 
  • Horse riders control your horse.

In fact, the southwestern and eastern parts of the park can be visited only by foot or on a horse. You can bring your own horse, or enjoy guided trail rides and pony rides at the Saddle Barn.

The third highest point in Indiana, Weed Patch Hill (elevation 1056 feet/322 meters), is located within the confines of the park, which is sometimes referred to as the "Little Smokies" because of frequent low lying fogs in the forested valleys of the park. Also known as Weed Patch Knob, is the third highest summit in the U.S. state of Indiana. Located in Washington Township and Brown County State Park, it is the highest point in the Knobstone Escarpment.

In Indiana, only Hoosier Hill (1257 feet/383 meters) in Wayne County and Sand Hill (1076 feet/328 meters) in Noble County are higher.

The peak visitation is in the fall during the leaf changing season. A significant portion of the park's annual visitors come during this time. The park affords a number of vistas that overlook wide swaths of deciduous forest that display a large array of colors in the fall.

With the wide variety of facilities and services available at Brown County State Park there is bound to be an experience to satisfy your outdoor preferences.

The varied facilities of Brown County State Park make possible enjoyable outdoor experiences for people with a wide range of tastes and preferences. Brown County State Park has not only attracted millions of individual tourists and families over the years, but has hosted many special events as well. Camping groups, horsemen's organizations and archery tournaments are some of the past attractions. In 1987, Brown County served as the location of the Cycling Road Race for the 10th Pan American Games.

Facilities:

Olympic sized pool, generally open from the Saturday before Memorial Day until no later than Labor Day. Inn, with more than 80 rooms. Cabins. Multiple campgrounds with hot showers and flush toilets. Campstore. Group Camping. Hiking on 12 trails totalling more than twelve miles. Fishing. Nature Center and Interpretive Naturalist Service. Picnic areas and shelters. Saddle barn, pony rides, hay rides. Tennis courts, amphitheatre.

Both the Yellowwood State Forest and Brown County State Park's many scenic, sprawling acres offer wonderful picnic spots, magnificent vistas, hiking and horse trails, abundant wildlife, and overnight campsites easily accessible to the public. With its close proximity to the quaint artists' colony of Nashville, Indiana, T.C. Steele State Historic Site, Monroe Reservoir, Lake Lemon, Yellowwood Lake, Morgan-Monroe State Forest, McCormick's Creek State Park and Indiana University, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities including an old fashioned picnic in the woods.

Picnickers have a variety of picnic areas to choose from, and some have shelters with fireplaces. Many are close to drinking water, restrooms, or Playground equipment. There are also several reservable shelter houses throughout the park.

Accommodations range from camping, starting at just under $25 a night for a full hookup, to modern, two-story family cabins that sleep up to eight, for $169 a night in the summer. In between are more basic but cute, rustic cabins built during the 1930s. They start at $69 a night. Hotel-style rooms at the lodge begin at $104 a night during summer season. The wide array of accommodations could be ideal for a large family reunion, with grandma and grandpa situated at the lodge, experienced outdoor types at the campgrounds and families wanting a full kitchen, king-sized bed and TV in the cabins.

All of the various campgrounds are open year-round at Brown County State Park. Camping choices include Class A (electric) campsites, Class B campsites, Horsemen Class A campsites, Horsemen Class C (primitive) campsites, a Youth Tent Area and a Rally Campground.

For visitors preferring all the comforts of home a stay at Abe Martin Lodge is just the ticket. Containing 84 bedrooms itself, the Lodge also operates 24 sleeping cabins (containing 56 bedrooms) and 20 family housekeeping cabins. The Lodge also houses meeting rooms and a public dining room.

Other facilities include:

Dumping station
Mountain bike trail
Nature Center
Playground
Rental and recreation building 
Shelter
Tennis courts 

Visitors to Brown County State Park can also enjoy an Olympic-size swimming pool and fishing (or ice fishing) on two lakes, Ogle Lake at 17 acres in size, and Strahl Lake covering 7 acres.

 The Nature Center also offers a variety of exhibits, displays and scheduled interpretive naturalist services year-round.


BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK HISTORY

 

Before the park was established in 1929, the scenic hills and valleys were homes for several farmers and the village of Kelp. During the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) workers planted thousands of trees in the park for erosion control. The CCC also built many of the shelters, picnic tables, roads and trails that still exist today.

 

Brown County State Park first opened to the public in 1929. Additional facilities were developed as the park became more popular. In the first few years Abe Martin Lodge, several cabins, a swimming pool, a saddle barn and Strahl Lake were constructed. The roads, entrances and many trails were also added and improved.

The Veteran's Civilian Conservation Corps Company 1557 began its work on June 1, 1934. They planted black locust, black walnut, various pines and spruces to help correct severe soil erosion. The CCC workers also built many of the existing buildings, shelter houses, picnic tables, ovens, roads, trails and the two log lookout towers. They cleared most of the vistas along Brown County State Park's roadways and built Ogle Lake in 1934-35.

Brown County State Park's forest is relatively-young. The large White Oak, Tulip and Black Walnut are noticeably absent.

This woodland, now the largest landholding of the Indiana State Park system, has had a long history of abuse and exploitation by man.

The first inhabitants of Brown County's forest probably didn't change it much. The transient Delaware Indian found Brown County's massive forest not at all conducive to hunting. He did find Wild Turkeys, Gray Squirrels and Black Bear, these being the deep woodland species; but his hunting more often led him to clearings or open areas, perhaps along streams, where a variety of game could be stalked or awaited.

Visits to the Buffalo migration route or so-called "trace"in southern Indiana, no doubt, kept him and his family on the move between Brown County and the southern Ohio Valley.

Harvesting what the wild animals didn't eat, come late summer, the Indian was probably content to sit idly on this landscape, marveling at and even worshiping the natural world around him.

His temporary shelter, called a "wigwam", was constructed of nearby reeds or cattails woven into mats that were laid across a simple framework of young saplings bent into a small, dome-like shape.

These were found by some of the early Brown County settlers about 1820.

If the Native Americans were unobtrusive in Brown County's forest, the white man was nearly the opposite. He came to make as good a living as possible for himself and his family. He viewed the forest as a vast hindrance to his plan to farm.

Trees were more in the way than cherished, and, to begin homesteading, they would have to be removed.

The settler's meager income wasn't helped at first from selling the timber, since its value was small.

But, soon, as furniture companies and mass-produced wood products became increasingly common, he found a means of supplementing his livelihood.

From 1840 to nearly the turn of this century, little of Brown County's forest land escaped the cutting crews. They quickly removed the biggest trees, the trunks of which yielded massive beams for buildings and bridges, and then found even-smaller oaks and hickories marketable in the barrel and cooperage trades.

Soon, the railroad industry was to make itself known in the area, and ties or so-called "sleepers", along with large quantities of cordwood, were removed from much of the hilly forestland.

Between 1850 and 1870, at least six leather tanneries settled here, using mostly white and chestnut oaks in their tanning businesses. Known as "tanbark", the bark of those trees was highly-sought while much of the stripped logs was left to lie and rot, unused.

Once removed of its protective forest cover, the ground awaited a plow and shovel.

Poor agricultural practices in the early 1900's, along with shallow topsoil, soon destined Brown County's farming community to a destitute existence. Not much hope confronted the back-country farmer who sank deeper into poverty and left his depleted farm after realizing no income.

But there were those who still saw the beauty in Brown County's ruggedness and were saddened by the departure of families who lived on and loved the land.

One such individual, a school- teacher-turned-insurance-salesman, was the late Lee Bright, of Nashville, Indiana. His plan was to restore Brown County to economic health in the booming Twenties by fostering the young, but promising, tourist trade.

Bright wanted to establish a state park, but Indiana law, at that time, did not authorize purchase of land for parks. Instead, the state Conservation Commission would buy that land for a fish-and-game preserve, which was sanctioned by law.

Abandoned farm acreage with depleted soil, eroded hillsides and tree stumps were to become a white-tail deer release site and a farm for the rearing of game birds.

By 1926, Bright, as an agent for the state, had purchased enough land at an average of $12.58 an acre, to establish a game reserve in Brown County.

Since 1941, the former game reserve has been administered as a State Park--unmanaged, protected and preserved, lasting into perpetuity for all citizens of Indiana and their guests to enjoy.

A park map now proclaims this land to be used for recreation, nature-study, picnicking, hiking or other pursuits in the intelligent use of leisure time.

Although much of Brown County's landscape has drastically changed from the days of the Native Americans, much of it now has become an internationally-known spectacle of year-around color.

Entrances to Brown County State Park

There are three entrances to Brown County State Park: 


North Gate Entrance

    (State Road 46 East, Columbus, IN side)

The North Gate Entrance is located on IN-46/IN-135 East of Nashville, Indiana

NOTE: RVs & vehicles towing trailers must use West Gate Entrance (off S.R. 46, west of Nashville).
North Gate Covered Bridge is restricted to 9 foot height and 3 ton weight limits
.If you use the North Gate entrance, you must go through a covered bridge over Salt Creek. Vertical clearance is only 9 feet. Large trucks, vans, campers or RV's may not make it through. If you have a roof rack with bikes or gear on top, be aware of the height of your vehicle. If your vehicle will not clear, you will have to use the West Gate Entrance.

  

If you use the North Gate Entrance, you must go through a covered bridge with a headroom clearance of only nine feet.  Tall vehicles or cars with bikes on top may not make it through.  If your vehicle will not clear you will have to use the West Gate Entrance located west of Nashville, Indiana on Highway 46.  The Horseman's Camp Entrance on the south side of the park cannot be used to enter or exit.  It is for the horse camp only.


Horseman's Camp Entrance

The Horseman's Camp Entrance is located on State Road IN-135 Southwest of Nashville, Indiana.

Horsemen's Campground users should use entrance off 135 South.
The Horseman's Camp Entrance on the south side of the park cannot be used to enter or exit.  It is for the horse camp only.

It does not provide access to mountain bike trails.


West Gate Entrance

     (State Road 46 West, Bloomington, IN side)

The West Gate Entrance is located on IN-46 Southwest of Nashville, Indiana.

     

Please carry out all trash you produce in order to keep your park clean and beautiful for others to enjoy.

Please read


ENTRANCE FEES

Brown County State Park is open every day, all year long, from 7 am to 11 pm.
(However, some park features are only open seasonally.)

Indiana State Parks and Reservoirs 
Entrance Fees

 

$4.00 Gate fee (Monday - Thursday) - Indiana licensed vehicle, motorcycle, or moped.  Admits driver and passengers.
$5.00 Gate fee (Friday - Sunday, Holidays)) - Indiana licensed vehicle, motorcycle, or moped.   Admits driver and passengers.
$7.00 Gate fee (daily) - Out-of-State licensed vehicle, motorcycle, or moped.   For noncommercial vehicles which do not have Indiana license plates. Admits driver and passengers.
$2.00 Daily fee per person - Walk-ins, entering as a pedestrian, on bicycle or horseback for each person, 5 years old and older  (children 4 & under admitted free).
Passenger Vans/School Buses with no Scheduled Group Program/Motorcoaches/Commercial buses
$2.00 per person, ages 5 years and above 

Groups with program reservations
$1.00 per person program fee.

$5.00 Daily Horse Permit
Entrance for one day per horse at DNR properties where horse use is allowed. (see Horse Use Fees)

ANNUAL PERMITS - admit the purchaser and passengers in a private, family type, non-commercial vehicle for the current year:
 * Good from January 1, until December 31, of the year issued.
$36.00 - INDIANA RESIDENTS
$46.00 - NON-INDIANA RESIDENTS
$18.00 - Golden Hoosier Passport - For Indiana Residents age 65 and older.

For Indiana residents who are at least 65 years of age or a resident eligible for Social Security disability payments under 42 U.S. C. 401 (proof of eligibility must be presented at time of purchase and disabled individual must be present in the vehicle at time of use); admits noncommercial vehicle, driver, and passengers. Good from January 1 until December 31 of the year issued. Price is 1/2 the Resident Annual Entrance Permit. May now be used at Falls of the Ohio Interpretive Center for up to 5 people per pass per visit.**

Golden Hoosier Permit Special Cases:

Indiana residents who are former POW's or their surviving spouses are entitled to a free Indiana Golden Hoosier Permit. These are mailed automatically at the beginning of each year.
Direct questions to cwilmoth@dnr.IN.gov

Indiana residents who qualify for a DAV1 or DAV2 license plate, may purchase an Indiana Golden Hoosier Permit regardless of age. Please present a completed form 32584 (Certificate of Eligibility for Veteran License Plates) at the time of purchase.

*DNR Annual Entrance Permits and Golden Hoosier Passports are not valid at Indiana Historic Sites that charge an entrance fee.

MAPS

of
 BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK

Park Map with Hiking Trails

Small version of Park Map

Buffalo Ridge Campground Map

Raccoon Ridge Campground Map

Taylor Ridge Campground Map

Rally & Youth Tent Campgrounds Map

Horsemen's Campground Map - Class A Sites

Horsemen's Campground Map - Class C Sites

Map of the Horse Trails


SWIMMING POOL

Brown County State Park is home to an Olympic-size swimming pool, plus a wading pool.

Also at the pool is a Snack Bar & Grill providing snacks and drinks, plus necessities like goggles and nose plugs.

Operation

The pool is open from 11am to 6pm. 

The pool is open the Saturday before Memorial Day through no later than Labor Day.

The pool may be closed some weekdays near the end of summer when lifeguards are unavailable.

NOTE: Days And Hours Of Operation Subject To Change Throughout The Season. Check With The Pool or Park Office. Pool Hours 12:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Daily.
Concession stand located at the Pool, same hours as Pool.

FEES & OTHER INFO

$2.00 - Daily admission per person per day.
$35.00 - Swimming Permit (allows 25 day uses). Valid for individuals, groups and families.
$.25 locker fee.

SWIM SUITS MANDATORY (NO CUTOFFS)
 NO ARTIFICIAL FLOTATION DEVICES
 812-988-5990

Note: Swimming at DNR Pools will close in the middle of August.

Lifeguards are on duty at swimming pool. 

Swimming pools and the beaches may close toward the end of the summer season when lifeguards are unavailable.

For pool operations, all infants, toddlers or small children who are not "potty trained" shall be required to wear an elasticized swim diaper before entering the pool area.

Fecal incidents may result in closure of the pool. These closures can last from several hours to 24 hours.

For children age 12 and under to enter a beach or pool area they must be supervised by someone age 16 or older.

Rules of The Pool

A lifeguard is on duty when the pool is open. 

All infants, toddlers or small children who are not "potty trained" shall be required to wear an elasticized swim diaper before entering the pool area.

Fecal incidents may result in closure of the pool. These closures can last from several hours to 24 hours.

For children age 12 and under to enter the pool area they must be supervised by someone age 16 or older.

Notice: Swimming in Ogle Lake or Strahl Lake is prohibited.


PLAYING FIELD

There is an enormous open area playing field near Hoosier's Nest Shelter House and the Park Office.

There are also large open areas in front of the Swimming Pool and at the large playground across from the Horsemen's Campground.


PLAYGROUNDS

Brown County State Park has several nice playgrounds for children to explore. Find playgrounds near the Horsemen's Campground, by several of the reservable shelter houses, and in the campgrounds.


TENNIS COURTS

There are two tennis courts open to the public near the North Gate House  near Saddlebarn and Lower Shelter.
The courts are available on a first-come first-served basis.

 Open 7:00 am to 11:00 pm. Night Lighting.

Bring your own tennis balls and rackets.

812-988-6406

***Prices And Hours Of Operation Subject To Change***

PICNIC AREAS & SHELTER HOUSES 

Family reunions at picnic shelters in the Brown County State Park are popular Hoosier pastimes. Some picnic areas require reservations, but many are simply "first come, first served". Brown County is a favorite summer vacation destination for most Hoosier families.

Throughout the park there are a total of twelve larger picnic areas with tables, grills and toilet facilities. There are many other picnic tables along the roadsides.

Some picnic areas are near payground equipment and/or playfields. Two picnic areas, one near Ogle Lake and one near Hesitation Point, have first come, first served shelter-houses containing electricity, picnic tables, grills, drinking water, and a fireplace. Wood is available from the Country Store during summer months.

The Brown County State Park Swimming Pool has picnic tables around the pool and outside the fence. The pool is located just inside the north park entrance (covered bridge entrance).

RESERVABLE SHELTER HOUSES

Brown County State Park has eight reservable shelterhouses that are open from 7 am to 11 pm. Shelters not reserved one day in advance will be open on a free, first come, first served basis.

Shelter houses are covered, non-enclosed buildings with electricity, picnic tables, grills and a parking spur (in general). However, each shelter is different. Some shelters include drinking water, modern restrooms, fireplaces and/or playgrounds.

The following Shelters correspond with the letters found on the park map

Lower Shelter - by the Saddle Barn

Upper Shelter - on hilltop by large Picnic Area

Walnut Shelter - on the way to Ogle Lake

Tulip Tree Shelter - by West Lookout Tower & scenic vistas

Hoosier's Nest Shelter - by the Park Office

Recreation Building Shelter - in Buffalo Ridge Campground

Strahl Lake Shelter - by Strahl Lake

C.C.C. Shelter - by scenic overlooks


Lower Shelter

The Lower Shelter is the largest shelter house in Brown County State Park. It is a 2-story building with 2 rooms in the upper level (measuring a total of 53'x75') and one room in the lower level measuring 32x29'. Located near the north entrance to the Park, the Swimming Pool, Saddle Barn, Tennis courts and a hiking trail are nearby. See also Hiking Trails

The Lower Shelter contains drinking water, electricity, a modern restroom, a vault toilet, and a playground. Wheelchair accessible restrooms are available at the nearby Abe Martin Lodge.


Upper Shelter

The Upper Shelter is a partially enclosed 59'x30' building with a paved floor, as well as 20 amp electrical service with 4 outlets. It seats 150 people and has 55 parking spaces. The shelter also has drinking water, modern wheelchair accessible restrooms, a playground, and vault toilets.

The Upper Shelter is surrounded by a very large and popular picnic area. 


Walnut Shelter

The Walnut Shelter is an open 31'x17' building with a paved floor. The shelter seats 60 people and has 18 parking spaces. Located on the south side of the road to Ogle Lake, the Walnut Shelter offers a small grill, a group grill, a playground and vault toilets.


Tulip Tree Shelter

The Tulip Tree Shelter is an open shelter with a paved floor, a small grill and a group grill. It seats 60 people and has 15 parking spaces. The shelter also has vault toilets and a playground.

Located on the south side of the West Gate Road, the Tulip Tree Shelter sits in a private, semi-wooded area. Hiking Trail #8, leading to the West Lookout Tower or Ogle Lake, is close by.
See also Hiking Trails


Hoosier's Nest Shelter

Hoosier's Nest Shelter resembles a small cabin. It has open windows and doors, a small second floor room, and front and back porches. This shelter seats 30 people and has 15 parking spaces.

Hoosier's Nest Shelter is located near a very large open playing field, the Park Office and Fire Tower. It is in a very high traffic area. This shelter contains a vault toilet and drinking water. Modern wheelchair accessible restrooms are very closeby, and the Camp Store is just 1.1 miles down the road.


Recreation Building Shelter

The Recreation Building Shelter is an enclosed shelter that has 20 amp electrical service with 5 outlets. The building seats 210 people and has 28 parking spaces. There are 35 picnic tables. 8 parking spaces are close to the building, with 25 more possible, but campers also use these.

The Recreation Building Shelter also has drinking water, vault toilets and a playground. Modern wheelchair accessible restrooms are available nearby. The Camp Store is just across the road, and the Nature Center is just 0.6 miles away.


Strahl Lake Shelter

The Strahl Lake Shelter is a partially enclosed shelter with a paved floor and 2 open fireplaces. Measuring 40'x20' the building seats 96 people and has 30 parking spaces. There is a large grassy area around the shelter, as well as a nearby hiking trail that goes around Strahl Lake and to the Nature Center. See also Hiking Trails

The Strahl Lake Shelter also has drinking water, modern wheelchair accessible restrooms and vault toilets. The shelter is right by Strahl Lake, and a playground is just 0.6 miles away.


C.C.C. Shelter

There are open and semi wooded areas near the C.C.C. Shelter. Scenic overlooks are also nearby. The shelter seats 60 people, and there are 20 parking spots available.

The C.C.C. Shelter also has a vault toilet and playground. Modern wheelchair accessible restrooms and drinking water are accessible at the Nature Center (0.6 miles away). The Camp Store is just 1 mile down the road.


 Fees & Reservations

SHELTER HOUSE FEES

Shelter house fees vary. You can find out rate information when reserving online or by phone.

SHELTER HOUSE RESERVATIONS

Most of the eight reservable shelter houses may be reserved up to one year (to the day) in advance.

Reservations may be made: 

by calling toll free 1-866-6-CAMP-IN

online at www.camp.in.gov

in person at the park office or by telephone (812-988-6406 park office) 

Shelters not reserved one day in advance will be open on a free, first come, first served basis.


NATURE CENTER

The Nature Center is one of the park's most popular attractions. The building houses a turkey habitat display, some snake and reptile cubicles, a turtle tank a bee hive along with an  Interpretive garden nearby and other displays and exhibits.

There is also a display (know as Mother Nature's Gallery) of many objects found on the walking trails, left or lost by hikers.

There are educational displays and a wildlife observation room for bird watching. Naturalists offer classes in natural history or wildlife and present nature-related projects and demonstrations.

The outdoor Interpretive Gardens include a variety of gardening exhibits.

Interpretive naturalist services and cultural arts programs are available year-round and are headquartered in the Nature Center (unless otherwise noted). Scheduled programs include hikes, guest speakers, history talks, a junior naturalist program, and evening programs. Special groups wishing programs just for their group should call in advance for this free service. Inquire at the Nature Center, Inn or Park Office.

During the summer months Brown County State Park offers an auto tour of the park with cassette tape. Inquire at the Nature Center.

The Nature Center is open year round, though winter hours are reduced.

Summer Hours:

Monday - Saturday 8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Sunday 1 pm - 4:30 pm

  Presentations for groups upon request.
Self-Guided Auto Tour.
Programs scheduled and posted throughout the park.
Amphitheater rental by request. 812-988-5240


OGLE HOLLOW NATURE PRESERVE

Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve is another noteworthy feature of the park. 

Ogle Hollow is located near the youth campground in Brown County State Park.  Its location is marked on the park map that is available at the gatehouse or park office.  Trail 5 leads through the preserve.

A brochure is available at the trailhead which describes many of the tree species found in the preserve. Cool moist conditions on this north-facing slope make the preserve particularly rich.  The rare yellowwood tree is an outstanding feature of this preserve.  Ogle Hollow is one of the few places in Indiana where these trees are found.  This stand of yellowwood trees, along with a similar stand in nearby Yellowwood State Forest, comprise the northernmost occurrence of this species.

  In addition to the yellowwood, chestnut oak and black oaks are found on the upper slope.  Red and white oaks are at lower elevations. 

The understory has beautiful flowering dogwood and redbud, mixed with pawpaw, spicebush, ironwood, and blue beech.  Wildflowers also add their color during the growing season.  Christmas fern is widely distributed, and often associated with maidenhair fern and narrowleaf spleenwort on the slopes.

 A naturalist works in the park year round.

The Nature Center is not far from Ogle Hollow and is well worth a visit.

A number of live snakes are on display, as are preserved specimens of birds, mammals and other residents of the park. A variety of publications are available in the Nature Center, including brochures on the birds, mammals, and insects of the park. There is also a bird observation area where you can watch feeding birds (and chipmunks) through mirrored glass.

 

HIKING

Hike Indiana Brown County State Park

For those who would rather see the park on foot or even on horseback, many miles of well-marked trails are available.
About 70 miles of bridle trails and over 12 miles of hiking trails lead through the steep, forested hills. The roadless southwestern and eastern parts of the park can be visited only by foot or horseback. The Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve, within the park, contains an attractive self-guiding nature trail, which describes natural aspects of the park.

Some trails in the park are quite steep and involve stairs, others are handicap accessible.

A diversity of plant and animal life can be studied through the park's gardens and trails, and at the Nature Center. There are over 200 species of flowers that bloom in the park between June and November. The variety of wildlife includes white-tailed deer, raccoon, squirrel and various birds.

Both the Yellowwood State Forest and Brown County State Park's many scenic, sprawling acres offer wonderful picnic spots, magnificent vistas,   hiking and abundant wildlife. With its close proximity to the quaint artist's colony of Nashville, Indiana, T.C. Steele State Historic Site, Monroe Reservoir, Lake Lemon, Yellowwood Lake, Morgan-Monroe State Forest, McCormick's Creek State Park and Indiana University, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities including an old fashioned picnic in the woods.

The Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail (20 mile marked trail) runs between Yellowwood Lake and the Fire Tower in Brown County State Park, with picnic tables in both locations.

At the access of each trail there are signs describing the trails obstacles, the elevation, the surface and width. The longest of the nine trails (trail 8) is a 3.5 mile walk near the West Gate entrance with a beautiful view from the overlook at Hesitation Point. The trails are classified as "easy", "rugged" or "moderate".

These trails are being rehabilitated by the volunteer organization, the Hoosier Hikers Council, on the third Saturday of every month, and by the state park itself, now that the state park staff has seen some of the HHC improvements.
The old trails go straight downhill and become erosion ditches. New trail sections are being built to reroute the trails out of these ditches. The new trail sections are being built with proper drainage and grade for the soil to hold.

Trail 8 is nearly complete.

In the process of these improvements, on trail 2, some large stone stairways built during the Civilian Conservation Corp days were discovered and are being restored. Some of the stones are rock slabs that are 6 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 1 foot thick.

Plans for a new 10 mile hiking trail in Brown County State Park are underway. 

The trail numbers on the following list correspond to the trail numbers on the park map.

PLEASE STAY ON MARKED TRAILS.

  • Mountain bikers yield to horse riders and hikers. Make your approach known well in advance.

  • Hikers yield to horse riders.
  • Horse riders control your horse.

Click on a trail number for pictures of and more information about the trail and its features:

TRAIL    

TRAIL TYPE

LENGTH

Trail 1

Moderate

0.9 miles 

Trail 2

Moderate

2 miles 

Trail 3

Moderate

1.25 miles 

Trail 4

Moderate

1.25 miles 

Trail 5

Rugged

0.75 miles 

Trail 6

Moderate

1.75 miles 

Trail 7

Moderate

1.5 miles 

Trail 8

Moderate

3.5 miles 

Trail 9

Rugged

3.0 / 2.75 miles

Trail 10

Rugged

2.2 miles

Friends Trail 

Easy

short

Discovery Trail 

Moderate

.5 mile

HIKING TRAILS:


Trail 1
LODGE TRAIL
(.9 mile/ moderate)

This is an easy 0.9 mile loop trail that joins with Trail 2 for a short distance to return to near the Abe Martin Lodge. Trail 1 leads through wooded land where oak, hickory, sassafras, beech and maple may be observed.

view the map here as trail 1 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 2
CCC TRAIL
(2 miles/ moderate)

CCC-built trail with impressive stone bridges, stairways and retaining walls. Starts and ends behind the lodge.

This is a moderate 2 mile loop trail that leads past the Lower Shelter House and North Lookout Tower. Passing several large trees in the park, Trail 2 circles to join with Trail 1 and Trail 3 to return near Abe Martin Lodge.

Trail 2 is part of a walking history tour with cassette tape. Inquire year-round at the front desk of Abe Martin Lodge.

The native white-tailed deer can occasionally be seen on this trail.

view the map here as trail 2 is highlighted in yellow


Trail 3
SADDLE BARN LOOP TRAIL
(1.25 miles/ moderate)

This is a moderate 1.25 mile loop trail passing the Saddle Barn and amphitheater to return near Abe Martin Lodge. Trail 3 is an interesting trail to observe a variety of topography.
Varieties of ferns can be seen in the ravines and on the slopes.

view the map here as trail 3 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 4
RALLY CAMPGROUND TRAIL
(1.25 miles / Moderate)

This is a moderate 1.25 mile loop trail starting near the front of the Rally Campground and leads through upland terrain to a deep ravine at the headwaters of Ogle Lake.

Trail 4 connects with Trail 5 at Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve(to the east) and joins with Trail 7 (to the west) for a short distance.

view the map here as trail 4 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 5
OGLE HOLLOW NATURE PRESERVE TRAIL
(0.75 miles / Rugged)

This is a rugged 0.75 mile loop trail. This self-guided nature trail through Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve describes natural aspects of the park. The trail starts near the paved park road north of the Rally Campground and continues down a wooded slope, where yellowwood trees exist.

Maps are provided at the beginning of the trail noting the points of interest

The pileated woodpecker has been observed in the area through which this passes. Trail 5 loops through the nature preserve, returns near the Rally Campground and intersects with Trail 4 from Ogle Lake.

view the map here as trail 5 is highlighted in yellow


Trail 6
STRAHL LAKE TRAIL
(.75 miles / moderate)

This is a moderate 0.75 mile trail that encircles Jimmie Strahl Lake. Hikers may enjoy an easy walk around the lake and return to the point of origin near the dam. A connecting spur trail leads a challenging .5 mile-spur to the Nature Center.

view the map here as trail 6 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 7
OGLE LAKE TRAIL
(1.5 miles / Moderate)

This is a moderate 1.5 loop mile trail enabling hikers to explore the shores of Ogle Lake while in a hilly, wooded habitat. Here also, pileated woodpeckers have been known to nest.

Trail 7 encircles Ogle Lake and connects with Trail 4 to the east and with Trail 8 to the north.

view the map here as trail 7 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 8
HHC TRAIL
(3.5 miles / Moderate)

This is a moderate 3.5 mile loop hiking trail that extends eastward from the West Lookout Tower, continues past Tulip Tree Shelter to near Hesitation Point, one of the most well known vistas in the park. Picnics at the overlooks are one of the parks most popular activities in the autumn.

The trail then leads southwest to the parking area at Ogle Lake and Trail 7.

Trail 8 was improved by volunteers from the Hoosier Hikers Council 2002-2007

view the map here as trail 8 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 8 has a lot of character. When starting at Ogle Lake, hiking the trail in a clockwise direction, you begin with a steady uphill section for about half a mile. At the top of the first climb there is a trail junction with the Tulip Tree Shelter connector trail. This connector trail cuts about a mile off of the hike. Continuing on Trail 8 you descend into a very scenic valley that is frequented by deer. Climbing out of the valley is another steady uphill trek for about a half mile until you reach the top of a ridge. Along the top of the ridge the trail parallels one of the park roads for about a mile and a quarter with many short ups and downs. About half way along this section you pass the upper end of the connector trail mentioned earlier. When you reach Hesitation Point, a very popular vista, you will have hiked more than two thirds of the trail and will begin a short downhill trek. After a couple hundred yards of easy descent, you will come to a very long set of steps.

This bears repeating. You come to a very long set of steps. This is why I hike this trail in the clockwise direction, to avoid climbing these steps. From the bottom of the steps you finish your hike with a very easy and pleasant walk along side a stream. The hike ends back at Ogle Lake.

You might want to extend your hike by walking counter-clockwise half way around the lake on Trail 7. Take Trail 4 up to the Rally Campgrounds, cross the parking lot and take Trail 5 down to Ogle Hollow. In the hollow connect back up to the lower section of Trail 4 and then around the north side of the lake on Trail 7 and back to the Ogle Lake parking lot. A very nice hike adding two and one half miles to your walk.

Other long trails which can be completed in a day, may also provide an enjoyable overnight experience. The Ten O'Clock Line Trail (about one-fourth on roadways) connects Brown County State Park and Yellowwood State Forest. The 10-mile Three Lakes Trail and the 10-mile Low Gap Trail (passing through a backcountry area) loop through Morgan-Monroe State Forest. The 6-mile Main Trail loops through the Patoka Reservoir property's roadless area; a spur trail leads to the primitive, backpack camping area. Contact the appropriate property office for up-to-date information on trail conditions and camping.


Trail 9
TAYLOR RIDGE TRAIL
(3.0/2.75 miles / Rugged)

Explore the newly-constructed Taylor Ridge Trail, dipping deep into the Hoosier Hills of Brown County State Park.

Starts near site 324 in the Taylor Ridge Campground. There is NO PARKING at trailhead. Trail 9 travels ridge top beyond campground, dropping into adjacent valley to follow stream before looping back to ridge top.

A 2.75-mile extension connects to Trail 7 near Ogle Lake.

You’ll hike through wooded bottomlands alive with pawpaws, hornbeams, fragrant witch hazel, and spicebush, and traverse high ridges studded with chestnut oaks. Begin on Trail 8 and hike south to 17-acre Ogle Lake. Continue to the southern end of the lake and turn left to join the Taylor Ridge Trail (9). From there, you’ll climb up and down the region’s “Hoosier Hills,” skirting cliff-like dropoffs and descending sharply into valleys. Travel the 3-mile loop at the trail’s end and swing back to the lake; keep heading east on Trail 7 to Trail 4 for a peek at the big cherry, oak, and tulip poplar trees (saved by one of the area’s original settlers) on a 2.75-mile trip through the Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve. Take Trails 4 and 7 back to Trail 8 and head back north to the West Lookout Tower.

view the map here as trail 9 is highlighted in yellow

Ther are two old roadbeds that intersect the trail.  Both roads appear on the USGS Nashville, Indiana quad map.  The first one is at the top of the first ridge.  The map indicates that this roadbed leads to the Buffalo Ridge Campground.  The other one is at the top of the second ridge and is an extension of Dogwood Lane.  According to the map it leads to the Taylor Ridge Campgrounds.

One road goes straight and continues to climb where Trial 9 Extension falls off to the right. It is actually a fairly well used trail.  It is not over grown and there were signs that the trail is in regular but infrequent use.  This is not an official park trail and it intersects with a trail that was newly opened in 2007. 

The trail climbs the ridgeline amid a second growth hardwood forest of beech, maple and oak.  The understory is not dense, and blow downs and other obstructions are not a problem.  There are even signs of some not so recent trail maintenance.  After just half a mile you will enter the Buffalo Ridge Campground at campsite 94. 

  At 1.1 miles from the lake parking area you arrive at the main campground road, just yards from the camp store.

The second road

Heading south onto the campground road you pass through a very open area.  After passing the nature center you will soon be back under the forest canopy.  The campground road travels along the ridgeline of Taylor Ridge and passes through a hardwood forest with a fair number of pine trees sprinkled in. 

Head down Dogwood Lane and after passing campsite 252 you will once again enter on an abandoned roadbed. 

 After three tenths of a mile, ther is the second road.  There is a short side trail to the right, maybe 65 feet long, that leads back to the Trail 9 extension.  (There was a side trail on the right before this one. I don't know where it goes but I can only invision something very bad. Take the second side trail on the right.) At the trail junction is a sign pointing left for Taylor Ridge and right for Ogle Lake. 

Turning right for Ogle Lake.

 After reaching the valley and crossing the dry creek bed, you will begin the hardest climb of the northbound trek, back up the first ridge.

 There you will reach the junction of the old road that leads to Buffalo Ridge Campground.  Back where you had started.  The GPS trip meter indicates 3.5 miles.  The rest of the way was all down hill arriving back at the Ogle Lake parking area. 


Trail 10
FIRE TOWER TRAIL
(2.2 miles / Rugged)

Follows ridge behind fire tower before looping northward crossing deep ravines and hilltops. Passes CCC shelter.

view the map here as trail 10 is highlighted in yellow


FRIENDS TRAIL
(Easy)

Short, easy, paved trail, with benches and vista on flat terrain. Constructed by the Friends of Brown County State Park.

view the map here as Friends Trail is highlighted in yellow


DISCOVERY TRAIL
(.5 mile / Moderate)

Self-guided nature trail. Brochure available at the trailhead at the south end of the Nature Center parking lot.

view the map here as Discovery Trail is highlighted in yellow

Other Trails Leading To and/or From Brown County State Park

Brown County D Trail     Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail


Brown County D Trail

Length: 2.1 miles

Uses: Hiking and horse riding

Special Features: This trail is a cooperative trail that is provided on National Forest land and maintained by the Indiana Trail Riders Association. It ties in to trails managed by the Department of Natural Resources.

The trail runs down Miller Ridge between trails on Brown County State Park and trails in the Nebo Ridge area. The entire length of the trail, to the junction where it ties in to other Brown County trails is 7.4 miles, only 2.1 of which are on National Forest land


Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail

Take a 16-mile walk along the Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail which connects Yellowwood State Forest and Brown County State Park.

Yellowwood State Forest is located about nine miles east on Ind. 46. It has 22,508 acres that include a campground. There are some long trails.

This trail can be hiked most of the year including winter months. Visitors will enjoy hob nobbing with the local wildlife and winter migratory birds.

It is hard to find information about this trail, however I will update when I seek more information.

Anybody having such information regarding the Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail, I would be (as would visitors of this site) very appreciative.
Email at jontanderson@juno.com

Here is a breakdown of the trail described by trail hiker, Randall. 

Where In The White Blazes Is The Damn Trail?

We hiked down to Strahl Lake and found where the Ten O' clock Line Trail joined up.

The trail began to lose its identity.

The trail disappeared into a tangle of saplings that was almost impossible to get through!

Along the road we went, and right down through the middle of Taylor Ridge campground in Brown County State Park. Taylor Ridge is a new addition to Brown County State Park and they used the Ten O' clock Line Trail to plot the campground road.

Walked along extended periods on pavement, then we actually hit a real trial!!

It had the white blazes so we followed it all the way out of Brown County State Park.

The trial headed down hill and right smack into somebody's backyard!

We now had the pleasure of walking on a gravel road that took us past an old abandoned ski resort.

We crossed an old suspension bridge that was on its last legs and I would not recommend that anyone do so in the future!! I got some water there and we crossed State Road 46 and continued on up another gravel road.

Bald Eagles and the Blue Heron roosts along the way.

We continued along the gravel road for what seemed like forever.

Finally, we came to an old iron trestle bridge that the state was no longer using. After crossing the bridge is more gravel roads!
About another mile or so on the road and finally, the woods at last.

We made camp in Yellowwood State Forest among the red pines and maples.

The access from off the southeastern road is poor and is perennially wet. This southern boundary of the tract is an old roadbed that is presently part of the Ten O'Clock Line Hiking Trail.

The trails are in great shape and have a lot of variety in terrain.

If you get a chance you need to go to Yellowwood State Forest and do some hiking!!! I highly recommend it!!!

I would not recommend the Ten O'clock Line Trail as a good hike because of all the roadwork.

You can read of his travels along the Ten O'clock Line Trail by going here along with checking out pictures taken by Randall.

Set of Photos 1

Set of Photos 2

For some additional information:

Trail Headquarters Bear Wallow
(812) 988-2636
3980 N. Bear Wallow Hill Road
Nashville, Indiana 47448

Trail headquarters offers several trails on a pre-registration basis only. Caters to groups, including Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. Call or write for more information.


HIKING TIPS

STAY ON BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK PROPERTY

Stay on designated footpaths whenever possible, and do not trespass on private property. You are responsible for helping maintain good relations between hikers and private property owners.

PLAN YOUR TRIPS

Before starting out, study maps of the area and learn the terrain. Be sure you are familiar with all the options of time, alternate routes, and weather. Do not forget the shorter daylight hours during late fall andwinter. Be sure to travel with a first aid kit, map and compass, and know how to use them. Remember to register at the nearest property office or gatehouse; for your safety, someone needs to know where you are.

PROPERLY DISPOSE OF LITTER

Burying trash and garbage was once the ethical way to dispose of litter outdoors. However, animals and frost action usually undo these efforts. Today, the problem is compounded by the high number of people using the same areas. The best policy is to carryout what you carry in (or at least, whatever you cannot burn if fires are allowed). You might consider going one step further and carry out anything others may have left behind.

KEEP PETS OFF THE TRAILS

Most of us love "man's best friend," but even on a leash a pet's presence may disturb the outdoor experience. Native wildlife often shies away from areas which dogs use, thus preventing the close observation many hikers desire. Barking also often disturbs other hikers, and sanitation within camping zones can become a problem.

BE CONSCIENTIOUS WITH HUMAN WASTE

In areas where restrooms are not provided, use areas at least 200 feet from any water supply and camping zone to eliminate waste. To promote decomposition and sanitary conditions, dig a small hole approximately eight inches deep, which can then be covered with loose soil and leaf litter.

 

Brown County State Park biking trails

Brown County State Park biking trails were named one of the Best Trails in the country by Bike Magazine in it's March 2009 issue!

Three words that describe one of the best-kept secrets of United States mountain biking.  However, Brown County won't be a secret for long.  It's been designed from scratch by mountain bikers for mountain bikers.  With miles and miles of flowing trail, scenic vistas and amazing terrain Brown County has become a world-class mountain biking destination.

In its March, 2009 issue Bike magazine named Brown County State Park one of the best 33 trail systems in North America!  It was also named runner-up in the "Best Trail Network" category.  The editors said "its singletrack is among the most varied terrain east of the Mississippi.  From berms to steep switchbacks to tight trees to rock gardens, these trails have it all.  And even more are on the way, with an ambitious expansion plan already in the works."

Bike magazine also said that Brown County has "flowed-out berms, tight switchbacks and hand-built rock features that will leave you thinking you landed in Tsali [North Carolina] or Canaan [West Virginia].  Ride an out-and-back, and you've got 30-plus miles.  Switchbacks?  Plenty.  Steep climbs?  Just like the East Coast.  Natural beauty?  It's at an all-time high in the fall."  Dirt Rag magazine wrote, "Hills, rocks, trees, roots.  A place that reminds you why wheels turn.  A place that reminds you that the grass isn't always greener two states over."

The Brown County mountain bike trail system is located entirely within Brown County State Park.  It is Indiana's largest state park.  Since 2004, the Hoosier Mountain Bike Association has been hard at work building the best singletrack trails around.  With three loops and five connector trails already complete, Brown County State Park has over twenty miles of trail with much more to come.

Details

Over twenty miles of pristine, winding singletrack trail. 

  • Mountain bikers yield to horse riders and hikers. Make your approach known well in advance.

  • Hikers yield to horse riders. 
  • Horse riders control your horse.

Beginner Trails: 

North Tower Connector Trail (North Gate Parking Lot to North Tower Loop), North Tower Loop, Limekiln Trail (Hoosiers Nest to Campgrounds), Pine Loop (North Gate Parking Lot to North Tower Connector Trail)

Intermediate Trails:  

Aynes Loop 

Advanced Trails:  

Hesitation Point Connector Trail (Hesitation Point to Aynes Loop), Walnut Trail (Hesitation Point to Hoosiers Nest)

Expert Trails:   

Schooner Trace (Walnut Trail near Hesitation Point to Walnut Trail near Hoosiers Nest)

  • All the trails are shared with hikers and trail runners.  Please know and follow IMBA's Rules of The Trail.

  • The trail system is open year round. 
  • The park is open from 6:00 am - 11:00 p.m. (EDT) 
  • Night riding is allowed until the park closes.

Directions to Trailheads

To reach the main trailhead enter the park through the North Gate Entrance located off of State Road 46 just east of Nashville, Indiana.  The mountain bike parking is just past the gatehouse and Swimming Pool on the right.  Shaded parking areas with restroom facilities are also located at the Lower and Upper Shelter areas nearby.  For those accessing the park through the West Entrance there is trail access (advanced skill level) at Hesitation Point.  Near the camprounds, there is trail access just off the Rally Campground parking lot near the Ogle Hollow Nature Preserve trailhead.  Guests of the Abe Martin Lodge and Cabins can access the trail system across the road from the North Lookout Tower.  There are two small trail access points with limited parking at Walnut Shelter and at Hoosiers Nest.

 Caution:  All of the locals know to roll "Sub-9"™.  If you use the North Gate Entrance, you must go through a covered bridge with a headroom clearance of only nine feet.  Tall vehicles or cars with bikes on top may not make it through.  If your vehicle will not clear you will have to use the West Gate Entrance located west of Nashville, Indiana on Highway 46.  The Horseman's Camp Entrance on the south side of the park cannot be used to enter or exit.  It is for the horse camp only.

The new Brown County State Park trail is a four-mile loop starting across from the north lookout tower. It highlights the end of the Kin Hubbard Ridge and Green Valley Creek areas. There is also a one-mile spur that begins at the parking lot south of the Swimming Pool that connects to the north lookout tower loop.

HORSEMEN'S CAMPGROUND 

The horsemen's campground is in Greenhorn Valley in the southeast section of the park and can be reached via an exclusive entrance off State Road 135 west of the Stone Head community.

SADDLE BARN
 Open late March through October, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm daily. Days of operation vary in early Spring, check with the the Saddle Barn for more specific information.


Horsemen Class A campsites

The Horsemen's Campground at Brown County State Park has 118 electric (Class A) modern campsites (1 is wheelchair accessible). These modern sites include:

  • electrical hookup 

  • picnic table 
  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • modern restrooms/showers 
  • tie-up for 6 horses* 
  • An Annual Horse Tag is required for each horse (see Horse Use Fees)


Horseman Primitive Sites
(Class C) 

The Horsemen's Campground at Brown County State Park has 91 primitive (Class C) campsites with pit toilets (no showers or restrooms).

These primitive sites include: 

  • picnic table 

  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • pit toilets (no showers or restrooms) 
  • tie-up for 6 horses*
  • An Annual Horse Tag is required for each horse (see Horse Use Fees)

 


SADDLE BARN & HORSEBACK RIDING

See the natural beauty of our state parks from a different perspective . . .

 from the back of a horse! 

Generations of families have come to the Brown County State Park saddle barn to trail ride. Many Hoosiers' first pony ride was here under the Sycamores.

Open 9 am to 5 pm daily (weather permitting), the Saddle Barn offers guided trail rides, pony rides and hayrides.

  • Trail rides (for the older ones) 

  • Pony rides (for the younger ones) 
  • Hayrides 

Children can take a pony ride in a corral behind the saddle barn and evening hayrides are available.

Many offer lessons, scout badges, gift certificates, birthday parties, corporate outings, campfire programs and other services.

Saddlebarns are open daily from Memorial Day Weekend through mid-August; then at least on weekends through October. Hours may be extended as weather permits, so call the location you'd like to visit for specific services and hours of operation.

The Saddle Barn can be reached by phone at (812) 988-8166. 

Horseman's camp and horse trails between Brown County State Park and Yellowwood State Forest make Brown County Indiana a trail rider's destination.

You are welcome to bring your own horse to explore the some 70 miles of bridle trails through the steep, forested hills of Brown County State Park. Day-use parking spots, as well as Class C (primitive) campsites and Class A campsites are available at the Horsemen's Campground, which caters to horse riding enthusiasts.
Each horse you bring into the park must have a Horse Tag (see Horse Use Fees).

MC/Visa accepted 

Open: Daily until November 1 

Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

TRAIL RIDES (8 yrs & older) with guide:
Price:

$15.00 - 2.2 mile (40 minutes) 
$25.00 - 3.3 mile (1 hours) 

$2.00 per lap for "parent" assisted pony rides 
(age 3 and under are free) 

Hayrides
$3.00 per person 

The phone number at the saddle barn is (812)988-8166. 

**Prices and Hours of operation subject to change. www.browncountysaddlebarn.com


Horse Use Fees

Horse Tag 

A Horse Tag is required for each horse on DNR property. The Annual Horse Tag is good from January 1, until December 31, of the year issued.

Horse Tags may be purchased in person at the park. Annual Horse Tags may also be purchased by mail (or by phone with credit card) at:

Horse Use Fees 

  • $20.00 annual horse tag - entitles one horse access and the use of DNR properties where horse use is allowed. Good from January 1, until December 31, of the year issued. NOTE: Click Here for information on Horseman's Campground, camping areas catering to horse riding enthusiasts.

  • $5.00 daily horse tag - entitles one horse access and the use of DNR properties where horse use is allowed.

  • Saddle Barns - Horse and pony rides vary by property and trail length 

DNR Customer Service Center
402 W Washington Street W160
Indianapolis IN, 46204
317-232-4200


A DIVERSITY OF TRAILS

All horsemen's trails are clearly marked with the appropriate letter (A, B, C, etc.) or number (1, 2, 3, etc.). All markers are located along the right hand side of the trails as you are riding away from the beginning point of the trail. This marking system will enable a rider to determine the direction which he is riding on a trail. A rider riding away from the beginning point of a trail will see the markers on his right, and a rider riding towards the beginning point of a trail will see the markers on his left.

See a map of the Horse Trails here

The following are brief descriptions of those trails that are authorized for horsemen use at Brown County State Park.

Trails A - J are wide and may be ridden two abreast.


Trail A  6.5 mi. 

The trail begins at Green Horn shelter near the campground registration gatehouse. A five-mile ride over terrain leads to Weed Patch Hill, site of the state park fire tower. A return trip of two miles follows Skinner Creek back to the west end of the horsemen's camp. You will notice an intersecting trail labeled A-1. This trail intersects the upper and lower loop of Trail A for those wishing to take a shorter ride.

Trail A-1  1.5 mi.

You will notice an intersecting trail labeled A-1. This trail intersects the upper and lower loop of Trail A for those wishing to take a shorter ride.

Trail B  10.9 mi.

The trail begins at three different marked trail heads along the south side of the horsemen's camp. A four-mile ride over varying terrain leads to a loop of approximately six miles. This portion of the trail provides some of the most challenging hills and scenic views to be found on the horse trail system at Brown County. Trail elevation varies from a height of nearly 950 feet above sea level on Talyor Ridge to a low of approximately 604 feet along Little Blue Creek.

Trail C   4.4 mi.

This trail serves as an extension of the Trail B loop. Trail C begins at approximately mile six of Trail B, just south of Taylor Ridge. It continues for a distance of nearly four miles west along Taylor Ridge and south through Bales Hollow and rejoins Trail B at the intersection with Little Blue Creek. Trail C falls steadily from a high elevation of almost 1,000 feet near it's beginning to a low of approximately 625 feet at its end.

Trail D   7.4 mi.

Co-op: This trail is marked and opened to horsemen through the cooperative efforts of the Department of Natural Resources, United States Forest Service and the Indiana Trail Riders Association. It is situated largely along Miller Ridge through the Hoosier National Forest. Trail D begins between mile one and two of Trail C and serves as a six-mile further continuation of the trails B and C loop for those who wish an experience in long distance riding. A continuation ride of the trails B, C and D loop from the horsemen's camp back to the horsemen's camp will cover nearly 20 miles and involve several hours.

Trail E    2.8 mi.

This trail begins near mile two of Trail B and continues for approximately two miles along a ridge trail to the little town of Story. An historic marker explaining the old Indian treaty line can be found at trail end.

Trail F    1.8 mi.

This trail begins near mile one of Trail A and after crossing the park boundary onto private property ends at a general store located on State Road 135, just east of the entrance to the horsemen's camp.

Trail G    6.6 mi.

This trail is maintained through the joint efforts of the Department of Natural Resources and the Indiana Trail Riders Association. It follows the long-established Ten O'clock Line trail beginning near mile one of Trail C and ending approximately 12 miles west at Yellowwood Lake and Yellowwood State Forest. Those segments of Trail G situated off of Brown County State Park are marked and maintained solely by the Indiana Trail Riders Association.

Note: Due to a bridge closing, Trail G stops approximately two miles from the park boundary


Trail H    2.9 mi.

This trail is maintained jointly by the Department of Natural Resources and the Indiana Trail Riders Association. It originated as an experiment to determine if additional trails could be opened and maintained by the DNR and ITRA without the use of bulldozers. Trail H begins on the southern most Trail B trail head leaving horsemen's camp and runs in a southwest direction across hills and ravines until it intersects with Trail E just south of Trail B.

Trail I    1.4 mi.

Opened in conjunction with Trail H, Trail I is also a narrow trail, running in a north-south direction from approximately the halfway point of Trail H and up to Trail B.

Trail J    3.2 mi.

Beginning on the northeast side of the paved campground road just up from the modern restrooms, Trail J climbs to the top of a ridge where it splits in two directions. For a shorter ride, the right or south fork runs down the ridge to connect with Trail A, near the Green Horn Shelter. The left or north fork leads up the ridge to join Trail A, just south of Five Points.

Trails 1-18 are narrow and must be ridden single file.


Trail 1    .3 mi.

A shorter trail that goes through a clearing and past a pond before coming out on a trail just past Trail F.

Trail 2    .9 mi.

This beautiful trail goes up the valley crossing the creek many times, climbs the hill and comes out on Trail A, just before Trail J.

Trail 3    .7 mi.

This trail starts about halfway up Trail A-1 and follows the ridge till it connects with Trail A.

Trail 4    .8 mi.

This trail starts about halfway up Trail A-1 and goes up the valley and comes out on Trail A, just before Trail A splits and goes to the firetower.

Trail 5    1.1 mi.

1.1 miles. A beautiful, easy ridge trail.

Trail 6    1.7 mi.

This trail starts on the Trail B on the ridge, above the primitive campground. It follows the ridge, drops into a valley and crosses Trail H at the creek. Then goes back up the hill and comes out on Trail I.

Trail 7    .7 mi.

Starting out on Trail H just above the Horsemen's camp, this is a cool, pleasant valley trail that goes past the foundation stones of a homestead cabin before climbing the hill and coming out on Trail B, just off the road.

Trail 8    .4 mi.

This trail starts off of Trail 7, just after it drops into the valley. It then follows a ridge and comes out on Trail I.

Trail 9    .7 mi.

This trail follows an old roadbed for awhile then drops into a valley before coming out on the Trail H.

Trail 10    .4 mi.

This trail starts out on Trail H at the far end of the valley from Trail 9. It wanders through some beautiful pine trees before coming out on Trail 11.

Trail 11    1.4 mi.

This trail also follows an old roadbed along a ridge, then crosses a valley and comes out on Trail E about halfway to Story.

Trail 12    .5 mi.

Starting just a short distance down Trail E, this trail follows a ridge before dropping into the valley and joining Trail B just before the picnic tables on Trail B.

Trail 13    1.5 mi.

This trail goes off of Trail B, just past Trail 7, drops into a valley, touches and goes around the end of a ridge and back up another valley before climbing to a ridge and following it to the picnic tables on Trail B.

Trail 14    2.5 mi.

This is a very beautiful ridge and valley trail. It starts up a ridge off of Trail B and comes back down the next valley and joins back up with Trail B just past Trail 15.

Trail 15    2.8 mi.

This trail starts off of Trail 14, and follows a ridge to a pond, just off of Trail B and follows Trail B for a short distance, turns off and follows a ridge before the picnic tables on the Little Blue Creek.

Trail 16    3.6 mi.

This trail follows an old roadbed off of the Trail B , then drops into the valley and crosses Trail D, just past the picnic tables. It then climbs back up to a ridge and follows this ridge to some pine trees on the back side of Trail D. Pack a lunch, the pine trees are a beautiful place to relax and eat lunch.

Trail 17    2 mi.

Starts at Five Points and follows an old fire trail near the east park boundary. Trail turns southward, drops down into a valley and passes through a site where sandstone was quarried to build some of the original parks buildings. Trail crosses ridges and gullies with Trail F.

Trail 18    .8 mi.

Trail follows and old roadbed from Five Points to its intersection with Trail 17 near an old stone quarry.

LOOK TO THE FUTURE

More than 80 percent of the nation's population resides in urban areas and Americans are seeking trail opportunities as never before. Horseback riders have increased to 17 million nationally from to 7.8 million in 1960, making it one of the fastest growing forms of recreation.

The critical task today is to make decisions that will determine the long-term fate of essential resources. At the same time, the growing population of outdoor enthusiasts visiting the State Park System's 57,000 acres require increased recreation and educational opportunities.

Just as trails benefit all, the responsibility for trail planning, development and maintenance must also be shared. The Indiana Trail Riders Association has joined the Department of Natural Resources to share these responsibilities and ask for your cooperation and help in preserving our park for use by future generations of trail riders. Please stay on the marked trails and "Pack Out what you Pack In". Brown County State Park showcases the grandeur of Indiana's natural beauty with its miles of hilly trails. Let's keep our park clean and beautiful.


BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK
HORSEMEN'S CAMP AND TRAIL RULES 

In order to make your visit most enjoyable and at the same time to provide the maximum degree of safety for you and for our other guests, we ask that you observe the following rules while you are in the park:

1. Horse Trail Permits must be purchased at the Horse Camp gatehouse for all horses entering Brown County State Park from April 1 thru November 30. This permit must be placed on the left side of the bridle for each horse while it is being ridden on the Brown County State Park horse trail system. Annual Horse Tags are valid from January 1, until December 31 of the year issued.

2. The park is open from 7:00 am through 11:00 pm. Quiet hours are to be observed after 11:00 pm, as a courtesy to our other park guests. Campers will not be permitted to set up their camp in the regular campground after midnight, also as a courtesy to other campers. Horsemen campers arriving after midnight will be permitted to camp in the day use area for the care of their horses after traveling long hours. They are to stay in this area until 7:00 am at which time they will permitted to move into the main campground. If no campsites are available for the following day or no space is available in the day use area, no overnight provisions will be provided.

3, Please limit your riding to the marked trails found within Brown County State Park and also, Trail D loop and Trail G which are located outside the park boundaries. It is important to stay on the marked trails to help prevent erosion because soils found within Brown County State Park are highly erodible.

4. Only hitch your horses at the designated areas.

5. Only one mode of transportation is permitted per campsite. One additional tow vehicle is permitted but it must remain hooked to towed equipment at all times.

6. Advise all visitors that they will have to park their cars in the visitor's parking lots located at each end of the horsemen's camp and walk to your site.

7. Dogs, cats or other pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet in length, or caged and they must be attended at all times.

8. Horses must be ridden at a walk while in the campground. 

Please clean up before you leave. Manure bins are provided for your convenience.


FISHING / ICE FISHING

At Brown County State Park you can enjoy warm-weather fishing or ice fishing for bass, bluegill and more on both Ogle Lake (17 acres) and Strahl Lake (7 acres).

Non-motorized boats (e.g. canoes, kayaks, rowboats) are allowed on Ogle Lakeonly.
However, there is no boat ramp and no boat rental.

STATE FISHING LICENSE

A state license is required to fish at Brown County State Park. Licenses are available at the park office and area bait and tackle stores, as well as online and by mail. For more information about purchasing a state fishing license call (317) 232-4200 or contact:

DNR Customer Service Center
402 W. Washington St., Room W160
Indianapolis, IN 46204 

Interested in Fishing Tips? 
Learn the Basics of How To Fish

www.angelfire.com/ia3/fishing

(another site by the webmaster)


OGLE LAKE

Brown County State Park is home to a couple of small lakes that are a float tube fisherman's dream. Impoundments resting in the bottom of flooded hallows, Ogle Lake and Strahl Lake are pristine waters of remarkable beauty that happen to hold some fish.

Now, don't expect any records to be hauled from the park's lakes anytime soon, but for the intensive purpose of enjoyable time spent fly fishing, these lakes will satisfy. Largemouth bass and bluegill are the dominate species found in the park.

The park's lakes are man-made. Ogle Lake (17 acres) was built in 1934 by the CCC, and Strahl Lake (7 acres) was built earlier in 1929.

Bank fishing is permitted in both lakes.

Non-motorized boats (e.g. canoes, kayaks, rowboats) are allowed on Ogle Lake only.

However, there is no boat ramp and no boat rental.

There is one picnic area near Ogle Lake.

There are two (2) Shelters located on and near Ogle Lake.

1. Walnut Shelter - on the way to Ogle Lake

on the map
Park Map

The Walnut Shelter is located on the south side of the road to Ogle Lake.

2. Tulip Tree Shelter

Shelter sits in a private, semi-wooded area. Hiking Trail #8, leading to the West Lookout Tower or Ogle Lake, is close by.

There are 5 trails along Ogle Lake's path:

Trail 4
RALLY CAMPGROUND TRAIL

This is a moderate 1.25 mile loop trail starting near the front of the Rally Campground and leads through upland terrain to a deep ravine at the headwaters of Ogle Lake.

view the map here as trail 4 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 5
OGLE HOLLOW NATURE PRESERVE TRAIL

Trail 5 loops through the nature preserve, returns near the Rally Campground and intersects with Trail 4 from Ogle Lake.

view the map here as trail 5 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 7
OGLE LAKE TRAIL

This is a moderate 1.5 loop mile trail enabling hikers to explore the shores of Ogle Lake while in a hilly, wooded habitat.

Trail 7 encircles Ogle Lake and connects with Trail 4 to the east and with Trail 8 to the north.

view the map here as trail 7 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 8
HHC TRAIL

The trail leads southwest to the parking area at Ogle Lake and Trail 7.

view the map here as trail 8 is highlighted in yellow

Trail 9
TAYLOR RIDGE TRAIL

From this trail, a 2.75-mile extension connects to Trail 7 near Ogle Lake.

view the map here as trail 9 is highlighted in yellow

Notice: Swimming in Ogle Lake or Strahl Lake is prohibited.


Strahl Lake

Strahl Lake is one of two lakes in Indiana's Brown County State Park.

Strahl Lake is on Strahl Creek in Brown County, Indiana and is used for recreation purposes. It has been there since 1939. It has a normal surface area of 11 acres.

Strahl Lake is owned by Indiana Department Of Natural Reservoirurces.

Strahl Lake Dam is of earthen construction. Its height is 28 feet with a length of 260 feet. Maximum discharge is 440 cubic feet per second. Its capacity is 103 acre feet. Normal storage is 52 acre feet. It drains an area of 0.68 square miles.

Brown County State Park first opened to the public in 1929. Additional facilities were developed as the park became more popular. In the first few years Abe Martin Lodge, several cabins, a Swimming Pool, a saddle barn and Strahl Lake were constructed.

Bank fishing is permitted in both lakes.

At Brown County State Park you can enjoy warm-weather fishing or ice fishing for bass, bluegill and more on both Ogle Lake (17 acres) and Strahl Lake (7 acres).

Non-motorized boats (e.g. canoes, kayaks, rowboats) are allowed on Ogle Lake only.
However, there is no boat ramp and no boat rental.

There is one Shelter located right by Strahl Lake.

Strahl Lake Shelter

on map
Park Map

There is a nearby hiking trail that goes around Strahl Lake and to the Nature Center.

Trail 6
STRAHL LAKE TRAIL

This is a moderate 0.75 mile trail that encircles Strahl Lake. Hikers may enjoy an easy walk around the lake and return to the point of origin near the dam.

view the map here as trail 6 is highlighted in yellow


CAMPGROUNDS

Learn the FUNdamentals of
Camping


www.angelfire.com/ia3/camping
(another site by the webmaster)

Electric Sites | Horseman Electric Sites | Non-Electric Sites | Horseman Primitive Sites | Rally Campground | Youth Tent Area | Country Store | Rules | Rates & Reservations

NOTE: RVs & vehicles towing trailers must use West Gate Entrance (off S.R. 46, west of Nashville).
North Gate Covered Bridge is restricted to 9 foot height and 3 ton weight limits.
Horsemen's Campground users should use entrance off 135 South.
  

Brown County State Park campgrounds offer primitive camping, campsites with & without electric, full hookups and horsemans camping. Rates start at $10/day. There is a Camp Store in the park. Pets are allowed and must be on leash. Each site has one picnic table and parking for one vehicle. Alcohol is not allowed in the park. Quiet hours are from 11 pm to 6 am.

DNR patrols regularly

As you negotiate when searching for campgrounds,
it helps to understand a few key words commonly used to describe the facilities:

Full hookup indicates that the campground offers electrical hookups for recreational vehicles (RVs). Tent campers should always check the ratio of tent sites to RV sites with hookup. A high ratio of RV sites usually indicates a more urban camping experience, which is not what most tent campers are looking for.

Dumping facilities are underground waste disposal sites for RVs and trailers.

Primitive campgrounds offer no hookups, no flush toilets, and sometimes no purified water. They may or may not have picnic tables. About all you can count on are pit toilets.

Group tenting sites are large sites for crowds, generally in the open.

Walk-in sites are far enough from the campground parking area that you will need to tote your supplies. In some campgrounds, the walk-in sites are reserved for hikers and bicycle campers.

Wooded indicates that the campground is built in a forest, which usually means a buffer of trees separate the sites, offering more privacy.

Open indicates the campground is built in a field, on the beach, or on a meadow of prairie grasses. The view of the countryside or ocean may compensate for the lack of privacy.

Flush toilets  flush (usually).

Pit toilets range from dilapidated outhouses to cinder block palaces with chalet roofs, but both offer views of a hole in the ground.

Never count on finding toilet paper in an outhouse.

  Bring a couple of rolls from home!


Buffalo Ridge Campgrounds

Review:

Campsites  82, 84 and 86 (Buffalo Ridge Electric) are semi-private sites that back up to the woods. You are in a more shaded area back here as well. They sit back from the main loop so it's a little less hectic than towards the main camping area. These are also not too far from a bath/shower house. Sites 6, 8 and 10 are good grass/flat sites; however they are in a very high traffic area. All sites in the Buffalo Ridge area are paved. 

Raccoon Ridge and Taylor Ridge are further back from the main camping area and have mostly dirt surface sites with some grass. Some sites back here are gravel and some are paved. 

There is a nice nature center located inside the campground area within walking distance from the Buffalo Ridge camping area. 

They have a large swimming pool, baby pool and concession area located in the park (about a 5 minute drive from the campground). They also have several horse/walking trails and nice picnic areas throughout the park.


Taylor Ridge Campgrounds

Review:

This was our first visit to Brown County. We stayed in Taylor Ridge Electric. What a beautiful park! There are areas that are more sunny (sites 1-100) and more wooded (100+). The things I liked were the modern (clean) shower houses, beautiful views and enormous swimming pool (capacity 2,450). Bicycles are a good idea as you can ride to the nature center and general store. The things you need to be careful of are picking a site that your RV will fit on. The website tells of the length, width, and slope as well as distance from water but you really need to check this when you book. Some are really short. In the more wooded areas there isn't much grass so we had a bit of dirt and gravel tracking into the coach. Bring bug spray! It is in the woods and you'll need it. We WILL return soon and camp here again. It was a great time despite being electric hookup only. This is the biggest park in the state of Indiana boasting 15,776 acres. It was 4.5 miles from the entrance to our site (#382). Highly recommend this park. We camped here in a Travel Trailer.

Each site in the pull through spots has concrete slabs about 12x8, a picnic table and a fire ring. The concrete patios are only about 6 inches apart.

There is plenty in the area to do/see and there is a winery across the road and a flea market next door.

******

We were here for a rally. A nice clubhouse for gatherings for rallies overlooking the fishing lake. Our site was plenty long enough for the MH (40 ft) and we had plenty of room for toad parking, slides and awnings. The site was level, gravel and grass. Roads are gravel so there is dust.

******

Brown County is beautiful in the fall. The roads are perfectly paved. We camped in the Taylor Ridge area, which appeared to be the most wooded and secluded. These are all electric sites. Some are better than others. I recommend site 330, if you can get it. We were at 349. It was mostly campers, and although I prefer to camp more privately, it wasn't too bad. We only had neighbors on one side thankfully.

Raccoon Ridge Campgrounds


CAMPSITE RESERVATIONS

See Online Reservation Info

Reservations for the campground at Brown County State Park can be made up to 6 months in advance. There are now 3 ways to make reservations:

Online Reservations - Make campground reservations for Brown County State Park here

Phone Reservations - Call 1-866-6CAMP-IN (1-866-622-6746).

Campsite Reservability - All campsites are now reservable, so reservations are recommended. Campsites not reserved are available on a "first-come first-served" basis, but you cannot count on their availability, especially during the summer.

Weekend Minimum Stay - There is a requirement of two nights on the non-holiday weekends: Friday & Saturday or Saturday & Sunday.

Holiday Weekend Minimum Stay - On holiday weekends campers are required to reserve three nights. For all major holidays within the reservation season, if the holiday is on a Friday the required stay will be Thursday through Saturday. If the holiday falls on a Monday the required minimum stay will be Friday through Sunday. If the holiday falls on a weekday it will just be a regular one night minimum stay.

Maximum Stay - Campers are limited to a maximum stay of 14 nights. After 14 nights the campers must vacate the property for 48 hours before they can reregister for an additional stay.

Cancellation - Changes or cancellations made up to the close of the business day prior to your scheduled arrival date will result in a $10 cancellation fee per reservation. For cancellations made on or after your scheduled arrival date you will forfeit the first nights camping fee and may be subject to additional fees per reservation, and you must contact the campground directly.

Transfers - The park does not give refunds for unused days. Reservations are transferable to other people or to other dates with seven days prior notice. Reservations may not be transferred to dates outside the reservation season at the property requested.

Note: Fees, operating hours and other details may change during the year. Swimming pools and beaches may close toward the end of the summer when lifeguards are unavailable.


CAMPSITE RATES


Standard Rates

Sunday - Wednesday

Thursday - Saturday

Holiday Weekends

Full Hookup

$24.48

$34.68

$38.76

Electric

$17.34

$25.50

$28.56

Non-Electric

$10.20

$13.26

$16.32

Primitive

$6.12

$8.16

$10.20


Horseman's Camping

Sunday - Wednesday

Thursday - Saturday

Holiday Weekends

Electric

$20.40

$28.56

$31,62

Non-Electric

$13.26

$16.32

$19.38

Primitive

$9.18

$11.22

$13.26


Other CRS camping rates:

Any Time

State Park Rally Camping

Minimum $50.00 (5 camping units @ $10.00 per unit)

Youth Tent Areas

Minimum $20.00 (10 people @ $2.00 per person)

Rent-A-Camp

$37.45

Shakamak/Lincoln Cottages

$20.00 - $40.00

Cancellation Fee

$10.00

Site/Date Changes

$5.00 (call center only)


"First come, first served" camping:

Available at the rates listed below for Forestry properties, Fish and Wildlife properties and backpack and canoe campgrounds which are not on Indiana's central reservation system.

Monday - Sunday

Electric

$18.00

Non-Electric

$12.00

Primitive

$8.00

Horseman's Improved*

$15.00

Horseman's Primitive

$12.00

Backpack or Canoe

$10.00

*electric or comfort station available

NOTE: Check-out time: 2:00 PM - Monday thru Saturday and 5:00 PM - Sundays and Holidays (check out time strictly enforced)

*All RV's and Vehicles with Trailers must use West Gate Entrance due to height and weight limits on Covered Bridge at North Gate Entrance. Both entrances are located on State Road 46

Disclaimer: Fees, operating hours and other details may change during the year.
Nightly Rate will vary and is based on the nights of your stay. e.g. weekend and holiday nightly rates may be different than weekday nightly rates.

Swimming pools and beaches may close when lifeguards are unavailable. Many beaches will remain open; however, most may be unguarded allowing patrons to swim at their own risk. Some services may not be available depending upon the State of Indiana's fiscal condition at the time.


CAMPGROUNDS
Electric Sites
(Class A) modern campsites

Brown County State Park features 401 electric (Class A) modern campsites (17 are wheelchair accessible), located in Buffalo Ridge, Taylor Ridge and Raccoon Ridge Campgrounds. These modern sites include:

  • electrical hookup

  • picnic table 
  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • modern restrooms/showers
  • Horseman Electric Sites

 
Horsemen Class A campsites

The Horsemen's Campground at Brown County State Park has 118 electric (Class A) modern campsites (1 is wheelchair accessible). These modern sites include:

  • electrical hookup 

  • picnic table 
  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • modern restrooms/showers 
  • tie-up for 6 horses* 
  • An Annual Horse Tag is required for each horse (see Horse Use Fees)


CAMPGROUNDS
Non-Electric Sites
(Class B) modern campsites

Brown County State Park has 28 non-electric (Class B) modern campsites with no electrical hookup.

They are all located in the semi-wooded Raccoon Ridge Campground.

These modern campsites include: 

  • picnic table 

  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • modern restrooms/showers

 
Horseman Primitive Sites
(Class C) 

The Horsemen's Campground at Brown County State Park has 91 primitive (Class C) campsites with pit toilets (no showers or restrooms).

These primitive sites include: 

  • picnic table 

  • fire ring 
  • parking spur 
  • drinking water supply in area 
  • pit toilets (no showers or restrooms) 
  • tie-up for 6 horses*
  • An Annual Horse Tag is required for each horse (see Horse Use Fees)


Rally Camp

Brown County State Park features a Rally Campground with 60 campsites with pit toilets (no showers or restrooms).

The Rally Campground is designed for groups of 5 or more camping units (families). These primitive campsites include:

  • drinking water supply near campground 

  • pit toilet


Youth Tent Camp

Brown County State Park has one primitive youth tent area with pit toilets (no showers or restrooms).

The campground features one group Youth Tent Area for:

  • groups of 10 or more with campers under 21 years and their adult leaders

  • the public, semi-public and not-for-profit groups only 
  • tent camping only

Youth Tent Area campsites include:

  • fire rings 

  • picnic tables 
  • pit toilets (no showers or restrooms) 
  • drinking water supply near campground


Camp Store

There is a Camp Store for picnic supplies and more. 

The Country Store, located by the entrance to the campgrounds, offers picnic supplies, souvenirs, gifts, snacks, refreshments, firewood & ice.

Store Hours:

Monday - Thursday 10 am - 6 pm
Friday 10 am - 7 pm
Saturday 9 am - 9 pm
Sunday 9 am - 6 pm

Closed November - March

Hours of operation subject to change


CAMPGROUNDS RULES

Please do your part to make sure everyone has a safe and enjoyable camping experience.

Pets - Many family pets do not seem to enjoy the camping experience nearly as much as their humans. The unfamiliarity and confusion of a busy campground and being constantly on a leash seem to upset some animals. Excessive noise and not cleaning up after pets leads to many complaints from other campers. Campers are responsible for their pets at all times. Do not leave them unattended. Pets must be on a leash 6 feet or less, in length.

Tables - Each site is outfitted with one picnic table. Borrowing tables from other sites is not allowed and creates discord when they must be retrieved for the site from which they were taken.

Vehicles - Reducing congestion and visitor safety are the reasons for the "one mode of transportation per site" rule. Additional vehicles must be parked in designated campground parking lots.

Number of people/tents per site - Six people is the maximum number allowed at a campsite. Each site may have two tents or one camper and one small tent.

Alcohol is strictly forbidden in the youth camps. At other properties, both daily visitors and campers are asked to be responsible when drinking alcohol. Possession of alcohol by persons under the age of 21 is against the law in Indiana, and this will be enforced.

Quiet hours are from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m. At night, voices carry so moderation is essential. Generators or other similar equipment which produces noise may only be in operation from 6 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

Check-out time is 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 5 p.m. on Sunday and holidays. If you plan to renew your registration, please do so by 10 a.m.

Nails and wires for suspending lanterns and patio lights can cause serious damage to trees. Burn damage permanently scars or kills trees.

Fires and firewood - Fires may be built only in the fire rings provided. Collecting firewood in state parks is prohibited. Firewood is for sale at the Camp Store.

Visitors to your site - Day visitors are welcome. They must park in the campground parking lot and may walk to your campsite. Campground hours are 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. each day.

Age of campers - At least one person at the campsite must be 18 years old. The responsible party registering for the campsite shall remain at the site for the entire stay.

Length of stay - Maximum length of stay is 14 consecutive nights. Campers must then vacate the property for 48 hours before reregistering for an additional stay.

Setup of campsite may begin after check out time on the first day, and the site must be clear by check out on the last day, except Sunday or Monday of a holiday weekend, when you may stay until 5:00 p.m. Campgrounds are closed at 11 p.m., and no setup of campsites may occur after midnight.

Renewing campsites - Campers are requested to renew sites by 10:00 a.m.


Camping Restrictions

Set-Up may begin after check out time on the first day and the site must be clear by check out on the last day, except Sunday or Monday of a holiday weekend, when you may stay until 5:00 p.m. Campers are requested to renew sites by 10:00 a.m. Campgrounds are closed at 11 p.m., and no set-up of campsites may occur after midnight. Generators or other similar equipment which produce noise may only be operated from 6 a.m. until 11:00 p.m.

Length of stay: Maximum length of stay is 14 consecutive nights. A minimum of Thursday and Friday, Friday and Saturday, or Saturday and Sunday is required for weekend reservations.

Number of people/tents/vehicles per site: Six people is the maximum number allowed at a campsite. Each site may have two tents or one camper and one small tent. Vehicles will be limited to either 1 or 2 per site depending upon the property. Additional vehicles must be parked in designated campground parking lots.

Age of campers: At least one person at the campsite must be 18 years old. The responsible party registering for the campsite shall remain at the site for the entire stay.

Visitors To your site: Day visitors are welcome. They must park in the campground parking lot and may walk to your campsite. Campground hours are 7:00 a.m. until 11:00 p.m. each day. Most campgrounds have a gatehouse to provide security and traffic control during the summer camping season.

Firewood: Collecting firewood or cutting down standing trees is not permitted in state parks and recreation areas. You can purchase firewood in most state parks and reservoirs.

Disclaimer: Fees, operating hours and other details may change during the year. Swimming pools and beaches may close toward end of season when lifeguards are unavailable. Many beaches will remain open, however, some may be unguarded allowing patrons to swim at their own risk. Some services may not be available if the State's fiscal condition does not improve.


Camping Etiquette 

Do your part to make sure everyone has a safe and enjoyable camping experience.

Pets: Many family pets do not seem to enjoy the camping experience nearly as much as their humans. The unfamiliarity and confusion of a busy campground and being constantly on a leash seem to upset some animals. Excessive noise and not cleaning up after pets leads to many complaints from other campers. Campers are responsible for their pets at all times. Do not leave them unattended. Pets must be on a leash 6 feet or less, in length.

Tables: Each site is outfitted with one picnic table. Borrowing tables from other sites is not allowed and creates discord when they must be retrieved for the site from which they were taken.

Vehicles: Reducing congestion and visitor safety are the reasons for the "one mode of transportation per site" rule.

Alcohol: is strictly forbidden at Indiana Dunes State Park and in all youth camps. At other properties, both daily visitors and campers are asked to be responsible when drinking alcohol. Possession of alcohol by persons under the age of 21 is against the law in Indiana; and this will be enforced.

Quiet Hours: are from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m. At night, voices carry so moderation is essential.

Check-out time: is 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 5 p.m. on Sunday and holidays.

Nails and wires: for suspending lanterns and patio lights can cause serious damage to trees. Burn damage permanently scars or kills trees.

Fires and Firewood: Fires may be built only in the fire rings provided. Collecting firewood in state parks is prohibited. Firewood is for sale at the park concession or campground store.

Brown County Indiana Lodging 
(in case it rains) 

Abbey-Inn
(close to west gate) 

Twin Oaks Lodge 
(Near Horsemans Camp) 

Nashville Indiana Accommodations 
(Downtown Nashville


CABINS

Enjoy a family cabin with your loved ones in Brown County State Park this year. The cabins offer privacy and comfort with bedrooms, living areas, kitchens and modern bathroom facilities.

As of January 1st, 2009 all cabins and other overnight facilities are non smoking.

Family Housekeeping Cabins

Twenty completely furnished, family housekeeping cabins (2 of which are wheelchair accessible) are available year-round. These are modern cabins with electric or wood heating and air-conditioning. Family cabins, each sleeping 8 people, offer privacy and comfort with bedrooms, living areas, kitchens and modern bathroom facilities. Family cabins are furnished with dishes, kitchen utensils, pots & pans, linens/blankets and pillows.

Rustic Sleeping Cabin Rooms

The sleeping cabin rooms are open from April through October.


ABE MARTIN LODGE

Abe Martin Lodge and the original cabins were built in 1932 of hand-hewn native stone and oak timbers that were cut in the park. Open all year long, the Main Lodge has two large lobbies with two fireplaces for relaxation, and beautiful outdoor verandas overlooking the sloping back lawn, park and, in the distance, the hills of Brown County. The Lodge also has  a unique gift shop a great cozy, rustic style restaurant and 30 rooms.

Another 54 rooms are located in the new addition. Motel-style rooms with electric heat and air-conditioning, carpeting (or wood floors), color television and a bathroom with shower. Linens, towels, etc. are furnished, but there are no kitchen facilities. Each bedroom contains two beds and a bathroom.

In many cases, there are connecting doors which can be unlocked to make a suite of 2 bedrooms.

NO PETS ALLOWED

This is a popular tourist destination and often requires long term planning:

There are many other wonderful lodging establishments near the park. 
Many Brown County Indiana lodgings are locally owned and operated. Many are secluded on several acres of woods affording privacy and a much needed escape from the hustle and bustle of city life.

Just to name a few:
Abbey-Inn
(close to west gate) 

Twin Oaks Lodge 
(Near Horsemans Camp) 

Nashville Indiana Accommodations 
(Downtown Nashville

Abe Martin Lodge truly has accommodations to meet any need. There are also ample meeting rooms for business meetings, reunions, weddings, or any function you may wish.

Construction has completed In 2008  on a 12,000 square foot indoor aquatic center. This aquatic center features a zero entry pool, water slide, water channel, fountains, water volleyball and basketball, and a whirlpool with a waterfall.


History of the Inn

Abe Martin has become a favorite son of Brown County and of the State Park. The Abe Martin Lodge commemorates his connection with the county.

Named for the cartoon character in the Indianapolis newspaper in the early 1900's.

For twenty-five years, from 1905-1930, "Abe Martin" was the mouthpiece for Kin Hubbard's daily quips in The Indianapolis News, which, accompanied by sketches of Abe and his friends in action, were syndicated across the nation.

Born in Bellefontaine, Ohio, then settled in Indianapolis, Hubbard started the Abe Martin character in 1904. At first Abe Martin belonged to no particular locality, but on February 3, 1905, he announced, "I'm goin' ter move ter Brown County Tewmorrow," and the next day he was depicted in a wagon piled high with household goods.

His comment was, "By cracky, it's sum travelin' ter git ter Brown County." The reason for the move lay in the fact that the steep hills and the general "picturesque-ness" of that area lent themselves to humorous exaggeration and provided the material Hubbard liked for his pictorial backgrounds.

Gradually many of Abe's neighbors came into being, to appear in the pictures and text. The cottages of the Abe Martin Lodge in the Park bear the names of these characters.

Much of Hubbard's humor is as timely now as it was during its heyday, from 1905 to 1930. Will Rogers called Kin Hubbard "America's greatest humorist."

Hubbard's cartoons played a significant part in drawing the attention of artists and tourists to Brown County. They, in turn, have made the area world famous. In dedication to his memory, the Department of Natural Resources built Abe Martin Lodge in 1932 on Kin Hubbard Ridge, naming the cottages after his principle characters.

Abe Martin Lodge operates different types of cabins to suit your various needs. Cabins are very popular, so reserve early!

Abe Martin Lodge offers guests a variety of options. You may choose to reserve one of the lodge rooms, patio rooms, rustic cabins or spacious two-story family cabins. Each accommodation includes wristbands for the Aquatic Center and are distributed by the number of guest each accommodation sleeps.


Lodge Rooms

Offers 84 spacious and comfortable lodge rooms. These rooms are furnished with either a king bed (accessible versions also available) or two queen beds.


Two Queen Bed Rooms:

Non-peak: $89.00 + tax
Peak: $104.00 + tax
Premium: $119.00 + tax

Includes four (4) water park wrist bands.


King Bed Rooms:

Non-peak: $89.00 + tax
Peak: $104.00 + tax
Premium: $119.00 + tax

Includes two (2) water park wrist bands.


CABIN RATES

Cabin Reservations

Phone Reservations - Reservations can be made by calling:

Abe Martin Lodge at (812) 988-4418 or toll free 1-877-265-6343 (1-877-AM-LODGE).

Reservations can be made in person at the Abe Martin Lodge.

Inn Reservation Call Center from 8 am to 8 pm daily at 1-877-563-4371 (1-877-LODGES1)

Online Reservations - Click here to make or check cabin (or lodge) reservations.

Minimum Cabin Stays

Off-peak Season:

  • Sunday - Thursday, 2 night minimum 

  • Weekend stay must include Friday and Saturday OR Saturday and Sunday
  • If seven nights or more are rented, no restriction on weekend stay, but the reservation cannot exceed 14 night rule.
  • During the off season, if a cabin is not rented within 14 days of an arrival date, it will be available for a one night rental through the call center only, with the exception of Holiday dates.

Peak Season: June 13th thru August 15th

During the peak season, the minimum rental requirement is 1 week 

If the weekly requirement has not been met within 30 days of the requested arrival date, a customer will be allowed to rent the cabin for a 2 night minimum.

Enjoy a family cabin with your loved ones in an Indiana State Park this year. The cabins offer privacy and comfort with bedrooms, living areas, kitchens and modern bathroom facilities.

Choose from modern cabins at Brown County, Chain O'Lakes, Harmonie, Lincoln, McCormick's Creek, Potato Creek, Shakamak, or Whitewater Memorial state parks. The capacities of the cabins range from four to eight depending on location (see chart below).

Cabins are very popular, so reserve early! Brown County's Abe Martin Lodge accepts reservations for their cabins up to two years in advance. All other parks accept reservations up to one year in advance.

General Family Cabin reservation details

To make reservations for a cabin, click here
 or toll-free at 877-LODGES1
Cabins must be reserved for either one or two weeks during June, July and August and for a minimum of Friday and Saturday or Saturday and Sunday nights during all other months. Cabins at Brown County require a minimum of two nights' reservation on weekends year-round. Minimum reservation periods in winter vary at the other parks.

Holiday Minimum Stays

Memorial Day (Fri/Sat/Sun) May 22nd, 23rd, & 24th, checkout on the 25th
Independence Day  (Thurs/Fri/Sat) July 2nd, 3rd, 4th, checkout on the 5th
Labor Day  (Fri/Sat/Sun) September 4th, 5th, & 6th, checkout on the 7th
Thanksgiving (Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat) November 25th, 26th, 27th, & 28th, checkout on the 29th
Christmas (Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat) December 23rd, 24th, 25th, & 26th, checkout on the 27th
New Years  (Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat) December 30th, 31st, January 1st & 2nd (2010), checkout on the 3rd

Some cabins are open year round, while others are only seasonal. Some cabins have full ADA accessibility also. Please contact the specific property to verify the features in your cabin(s) of choice.

Additional Reservation Information

Payment Policy - Half of the payment is due at the time of the reservation. The remaining amount is due 30 days prior to your arrival date.

Cancellation Policy - Changes or cancellations made up to the close of the business day 91 days or more prior to your arrival date will result in a $25 cancellation fee per reservation. Reservations canceled 90 days or less of your scheduled arrival date will result in the loss of the first night's cabin rental fee or $75 (whichever is less) per reservation. For cancellations made on or after your scheduled arrival date you will forfeit the first night's cabin fee and may be subject to additional fees per reservation, and you must Park Office or Campground directly.

Advance Reservations - Reservations can be made up to 1 year in advance.

Minimum Stay - During the off-season there is a 2 night minimum stay Sunday through Thursday. Weekend stays during this time must include both Friday and Saturday nights. During the peak season (third week of June through second week of August) there is a minimum stay of 7 nights, Saturday to Saturday.

Holiday Minimum Stay - Holidays require a 2 or more night minimum stay, depending on the holiday.

Returned Check Fee - $20.00 will be charged for all checks returned by the bank.


Abe Martin Lodge Dining

With its rustic charm and quaint elegance, the Little Gem Restaurant is the perfect place to sit back, relax and enjoy a delicious meal. Choose a 'Hoosier Classic' from the menu or tempt yourself with thier unique buffets. An outdoor patio seating offers spectacular views of the woods and park. The Little Gem Restaurant is open daily for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Abe Martin Lodge also feature delicious specialty buffets on the weekends.


Restaurant Hours

April 1 - September 30

Breakfast & Lunch: 7:00 am - 2:00 pm
Dinner: 5:00 - 8:00 pm
Sunday Breakfast: 7:00 - 10:00 am
Sunday Hoosier Buffet: 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Dinner Sunday - Thursday: 5:00 - 8:00 pm
Dinner Friday and Saturday: 5:00 - 9:00 pm

October 1 - 31

Breakfast & Lunch: 7:00 am - 2:00 pm
Dinner: 5:00 - 9:00 pm
Sunday Breakfast: 7:00 - 10:00 am
Sunday Hoosier Buffet: 11:00 am - 2:00 pm

November 1 - March 31

Breakfast & Lunch: 8:00 am - 2:00 pm
Dinner: 5:00 - 7:00 pm
Sunday Breakfast: 7:00 - 10:00 am
Sunday Hoosier Buffet: 11:00 am - 2:00 pm


Groups

Call 877-AM-LODGE (877-265-6343) and ask for Group Sales

The Abe Martin Lodge is perfect for your next conference, meeting, wedding or retreat. The Abe Martin Lodge has meeting rooms, conference facilities and private dining areas available for your next reception, banquet, conference and reunion. Seating capacity for meetings ranges from ten to 400.

The banquet department caters private meals, snacks and breaks to your meeting room. They can also cater a barbeque or meal function at one of the park shelter houses for groups of 50 or more. For smaller picnic groups, they can prepare box lunches.

Many recreational activities are available to you at the Abe Martin Lodge. The coordinator plans exciting activities each week and often plans private ones for groups. Horseback riding, hiking, mountain biking on some of Indiana's most scenic trails are just minutes from the lodge entrance and can easily be coordinated for your group or conference.

Melodeon Hall

Melodeon Hall is the Abe Martin Lodge largest and most spacious meeting room, accommodating up to 400 people in theatre style seating. Melodeon Hall is a very popular choice for corporate events, vendor presentations, weddings, and banquets.

Allison Peabody Room

The Allison Peabody Room with its hard wood floors, flanked on each end by fireplaces, stonework, and open-beamed ceiling presents the pinnacle of rustic elegance. Versatile and charming, the Ms. Allison Peabody room is the most sought after meeting space.

Ms. Priness Room

The Ms. Priness Room is a very versatile, multi-function room offering a wide array of configurations.

Pearl Slocum Room

Just off of the Little Gem Restaurant, the Pearl Slocum Room is available for private dinning, meetings, and special occasions.

Grama Pash Room

The Grama Pash Room is adjacent to the Little Gem Restaurant with its scenic views and charming stone work is available for private functions.


Abe Martin Lodge
Aquatic Center

The brand new indoor aquatic center at the Abe Martin Lodge is a many-angled fixation. From the outside, the huge structure has been gracefully and tastefully integrated into the oh-so traditional look of Brown County's premier lodging destination. From the inside, huge walls of glass reveal the rustic beauty of the setting.

But with the addition of the aquatic center, which features a huge water slide, a sort of "lazy river" water channel, fountains, and a grotto-like spa and whirlpool with a Brown County stone waterfall, hospitality at the Lodge has moved into new territory.

It is more than a "state of the art" water entertainment facility it-is full on architectural/aquatic art, kinetic sculpture, if you will, with the random active element of the seemingly inexhaustible energy, excitement and wonder of children.

The central feature of this watery paradise is something called a "zero entry pool," a gentle beach-like slope from the edge down to a three-foot depth. This wide, shallow pool features fountains that spray from various different directions, a tower which spurts, spews, and gushes water, including by means of small dump buckets.

Some features include:

The "water canon," which allows you to direct a large spray of water around the pool.

 A large spout of water dropping directly onto your head from about ten feet,

 The waters of the looping, moving water channel which resembles the "lazy river" feature at some outdoor water facilities. It wraps around a little circular cove with an underwater bench, with everything done up in blue tile and a concrete finish that is brown and has impressions of leaves and vines-a very classy look.

The water slide.

Climb to the top to the highest point in the building-its worth it just for the eagle-eye view of the wonderfully-designed facility-and then take the plunge and slide down out of the flume at the bottom into the catch pool.

The center also has a roomy pool dedicated to water volleyball and basketball, and is equipped with a chair lift for the aged or disabled.

There is one feature however, that must have been included more with the older clientele in mind, and that is the big, beautiful hot tub/whirlpool complete with a dribbling waterfall that drizzles hot water over your head as you back and legs are massaged by pulsing jets.

Safety has been built-in. 

There are two lifeguards on duty, one right at the bottom of the water slide, some days there are two staff members present at all times.

The layout of the building makes it virtually impossible for a child to get out of your sight with a simple look around.


Camping with Critters in Brown County State Park

Camp sites in Brown County State Park share space with critters, some of which can do you harm.

Please remember you are coming to the woods!  If you are lucky you will be greeted only by Brown County Lady Bugs upon your arrival. They are harmless and in fact quite beneficial to the environment. Always be aware there are some critters around that can be bothersome and even dangerous, including wasps, ticks, spiders & snakes. If you are allergic to insects or pollen be sure to bring your antihistamine. If you plan to visit the park bring bug repellant, sunscreen, etc.

The copperhead snake is one to avoid. If bitten by one of these critters, seek medical care as soon as possible.

Don't forget to visit the Nature Center to learn more about the park critters. 

Please let wild animals remain wild. Feeding deer is prohibited. Feeding of wild animals can be harmful to both animals and people. Animals that depend on handouts become a nuisance to park visitors and a danger to themselves.
Lock all food and coolers inside vehicles or campers. Roll up car windows tightly.


HUNTING IN BROWN COUNTY STATE PARK


License Fees 

All 2009 annual licenses and stamp privileges are valid from April 1 through March 31. Other licenses are valid only during the season for that animal as established in the Indiana Administrative Code (312 IAC 9).

Resident Licenses

License category

License name

Fee

Apprentice License Available?

Combination Licenses

Hunting & Fishing

$25.00

Yes

Youth Consolidated Hunt/Trap

$7.00

Yes

Fishing

Annual Fishing

$17.00

 

One-day Fishing (includes Trout/Salmon)

$9.00

 

Annual Senior Fishing

$3.00

 

Senior Fish-for-Life

$17.00

 

Voluntary Senior Annual Fishing

$3.00

 

Trout/Salmon Stamp Privilege

$11.00

 

Hunting

Annual Hunting

$17.00

Yes

Deer Hunting

$24.00

Yes

Deer Hunting - Second and Additional Resident Bonus Antlerless Deer License only

$15.00

Yes

Spring Turkey

$25.00

Yes

Fall Turkey

$25.00

Yes

Hunting Stamp Privileges

Waterfowl Stamp Privilege

$6.75

 

Game Bird Habitat Stamp Privilege

$6.75

 

Trapping

Annual Trapping

$17.00

 

Disabled American Veterans

Hunting & Fishing (does not include deer & turkey)

$2.75

 

Non-Resident Licenses

License category

License name

Fee

Apprentice License Available?

Fishing

Annual Fishing

$35.00

 

One-day Fishing (includes Trout/Salmon)

$9.00

 

Seven-day Fishing

$20.00

 

Trout/Salmon Stamp Privilege

$11.00

 

Hunting

Annual Hunting

$80.00

Yes

Youth Annual Hunting

$17.00

Yes

Five-day Hunting

$31.00

Yes

Deer Hunting

$150.00

Yes

Deer Hunting - Second and Additional Resident Bonus Antlerless Deer License only

$24.00

Yes

Youth Deer Hunting

$24.00

Yes

Spring Turkey

$120.00

Yes

Youth Spring Turkey

$25.00

Yes

Fall Turkey

$120.00

Yes

Youth Fall Turkey

$25.00

Yes

Private Shooting Preserve

$8.75

 

Hunting Stamp Privileges

Waterfowl Stamp Privilege

$6.75

 

Game Bird Habitat Stamp Privilege

$6.75

 

Trapping

Annual Trapping

$140.00

 

Youth Annual Trapping

$17.00

 

A resident is a person who has lived in Indiana continuously for a full period of 60 consecutive days preceding the date of a license purchase and does not claim residency for hunting, fishing, or trapping in any state other than Indiana or any country other than the United States.

* A person must first purchase a Bonus Antlerless Deer License at the rate of $24.00 (residents) or $150.00 (non-residents) before purchasing the Second and any Additional Bonus Antlerless Deer Licenses at the reduced rate.

** Youth hunting licenses are valid until March 31 of the year following the year of purchase, even if the individual turns 18 during that time period.

Apprentice Hunting Licenses

  • An apprentice hunter can be of any age. 

  • An apprentice hunter can be a resident or non-resident. 
  • Apprentice licenses allow individuals to experience hunting without having to take a hunter education class.
  • An individual can purchase no more than 3 apprentice hunting licenses during his/her lifetime. 
  • An individual who is at least 18 years old and has a valid hunting license (or is exempt from needing a hunting license under state law) must be in close proximity and be able to communicate at all times with the apprentice hunter.  The individual who accompanies the apprentice hunter cannot accompany more than 2 apprentice hunters at one time while in the field.

Lost Licenses

Duplicate licenses can be purchased through the Customer Service Center (317) 232-4200 or online at https://secure.in.gov/apps/dnr/htf/license/reprint/. The cost of a reprint or duplicated license is $3.00 for each license. An exception is if you have purchased your license and could not print the license, you can get a reprint for free if it is within 5 days of the purchase. Go to the website https://secure.in.gov/apps/dnr/htf/license/reprint/ to reprint or order a duplicate license.


PARK RULES

Visitors shall follow Brown County State Park rules, which are designed to fulfill the purpose for which state parks were established, namely, to preserve a primitive landscape in its natural condition for the public’s use and enjoyment.

Brown County State Park is for the public - please have respect for it. All visitors are expected to observe the following rules, which are designed to preserve a primitive landscape in its natural condition for the use and enjoyment of the people.

  • Do not injure or damage any structure, rock, tree, flower, bird or wild animal within the Park. Do NOT gather limbs, brush or trees (either dead or alive) for firewood! They MUST be allowed to remain to rebuild the natural humus.

  • Any firearm, BB gun, air gun, CO2 gun, bow and arrow, or spear gun in possession in a state park must be unloaded or un-nocked and stored in a case or locked within a vehicle except when participating in an activity authorized by written permit.

  • Dogs and cats must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and attended at all times.

  • There shall be no vending or advertising without permission of the Department of Natural Resources.

  • Camping is permitted only in the campground. Youth groups must be under adult supervision.

  • Fires shall be built only in spaces provided.

  • Please comply with the Carry In/Carry Out trash policy in all day use areas. Overnight guests must put waste in receptacles provided for that purpose.

  • Motorists will observe speed limits as posted, and park in designated areas. 30 m.p.h. maximum.

  • Swimming is limited to the Swimming Pool only. Swimming is not allowed in Ogle or Strahl Lake.

  • Drinking water should be taken only from pumps, hydrants or fountains provided for that purpose. This water is tested regularly for purity.

  • Report lost or found articles to the park office.

  • All motorized vehicles must remain on paved roadway. Snowmobiles are prohibited.

  • Use of metal detectors is prohibited.

  • Park closes from 11:00 PM until 7:00 AM, and no one is allowed in the park between these hours except for overnight Inn guest and campers.

  • Please let wild animals remain wild. Feeding deer is prohibited. Feeding of all wild animals can result in harm to both animals and people. Animals that depend on handouts become a nuisance to park visitors and a danger to themselves. Please lock up all food and coolers inside cars or campers.

  • Please stay on marked trails. 

For a complete list of rules and regulations inquire at the Park Office.


CONTACT INFO

Brown County State Park Office: 

Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 608
Nashville, Indiana 47448
(812) 988-6406 

Nature Center: 

Nature Center
Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 608
Nashville, Indiana 47448
(812) 988-7185 

Saddle Barn: 

Saddle Barn
Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 608
Nashville, Indiana 47448
(812) 988-8166

Swimming Pool: 

Swimming Pool
Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 608
Nashville, Indiana 47448 
(812) 988-7885

Abe Martin Lodge: 

Abe Martin Lodge
Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 547
Nashville, Indiana 47448
amlsales@dnr.state.in.us
abemartinlodgesales@dnr.state.in.us
(812) 988-4418 
or
1-877-265-6343 (toll free) 

Indiana DNR State Parks & Reservoirs Division:
parklakeinfo@dnr.state.in.us


Carry in and Carry out Trash Policy 

Most State and local parks and forest picnic areas, shelters, beaches, and other day-use areas have a Trash Free program.

 Visitors should provide their own trash bags for their disposable trash, separate their trash from recyclable items, bag and carry their trash and recyclable items to the provided large trash dumpster and recycle bin trailer on site after each visit.

Why? 

Home away from home: The outdoors belongs to all of us . . .

and just like home . . .

we need to care for it and keep it clean. 
Too many visitors would fill the trash receptacles and leave the area. The next visitor would have to contend with unsightly, filled trash cans or carry someone else's trash to the trash dumpster.

Less mess: Removal of the garbage and recycling containers immediately after each visit eliminates the smells and mess they create. It also cuts down on scavenging insects, bees, rodents, and geese.

Reduce, reuse, and recycle: Brown County State Park promotes and encourage all residents to recycle and reduce waste. Better yet, we can make new choices of what to bring with us. The more reusable things we pack, the less garbage we'll create. It's good for us and for our environment.

Thank you for helping by "toting out what you toted in".

Ideas for Cutting Down on Wastes

Reuse - Bring reusable cups, plates, and utensils. 

Bring beverages in reusable containers.  

Use cloth napkins and tablecloths. 

Reduce - Buy durable outdoor equipment. It may cost more at first, but it will last longer. That saves money and resources.

Recycle - Separate recyclables from the rest of your trash. 

Typical recyclables: aluminum cans, steel (tin) cans, bimetal cans, #1 and #2 plastics, glass, paper, and cardboard. Bag them up and dispose of them through your community recycling program.

Typical non-recyclables: paper or cardboard that has contained food, and #3 - #7 plastics. Discard these items in your home garbage.

Help close the "recycling loop" by buying products made from recycled materials.

You can easily occupy yourself for a weekend without leaving the park, but there's quite a bit to do nearby as well.

Art lovers will find plenty to interest them. Brown County has been welcoming artists since the days of famed painter T.C. Steele at the turn of the last century. His home and studio are open to the public as are the many galleries in Nashville, Indiana, just a few miles from the park. Nashville is a quaint little tourist town with lots of shopping and several very nice B&Bs, including the Artist's Colony Inn and the Cornerstone Inn.

Bloomington, home of Indiana University, is just 15 miles from the park, with all the arts and culture of a big college town and a few things unique to Bloomington and this particular university.

The city is home to the only Tibetan Cultural Center in the United States. It's open to the public.

The university houses the Kinsey Institute, founded in 1947 to promote research and scholarship on human sexuality. Reservations are required for the free public tours (812-855-7686).

Bloomington is also the place to be if you're searching for some ethnic dining in southern Indiana.
Midwest Living magazine recently named it one of the Top 5 Food Towns in the Midwest, along with Madison, Wis., Traverse City, Mich., Ann Arbor Mich., and Des Moines, Iowa. Bloomington has a wide array of restaurants including Ethiopian, Burmese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Turkish and Thai.

 

 
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